Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Urbana in Champaign County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

The Johnson Manufacturing Company

 
 
The Johnson Manufacturing Company Marker (side A) image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., November 9, 2008
1. The Johnson Manufacturing Company Marker (side A)
Inscription. Side A:
The Johnson Manufacturing Company was incorporated in 1902 by brothers James B., J. Will, Isaac T., and Charles F. Johnson, all of Quaker heritage. The company manufactured tin and galvanized iron ware for railroad lines across the United States. The initial product was the No. 1 long-spouted locomotive oiler with the patented dripless spout. That was quickly followed by other types of oil cans, signaling equipment, engine buckets, tallow pots, torches, track inspection devices, tin cups, and caboose and cabin car lamps, all carrying the Diamond J trademark. The makers created the patterns and everything was cut, riveted, and soldered by hand. As production expanded, the original frame building at 605 Miami Street was replaced by a brick structure in 1910, the southernmost part of the present building.
(Continued on other side)
Side B:
(Continued from other side)
Subsequent additions expanded capacity and the Johnson Manufacturing Company became a national leader in the manufacture of railroad operating supplies. During the Great Depression, the Roll Rite cigarette roller, poultry waterers, and hygrometers were produced from patented Johnson designs. About 1939, the firm turned from railroads to the trucking industry, designing and manufacturing air and vacuum reservoirs
The Johnson Manufacturing Company Marker (side B) image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., November 9, 2008
2. The Johnson Manufacturing Company Marker (side B)
for brake systems. In the 1970s, during the presidency of Charles F. Johnson III, the historic original building was restored, a product museum created, the 75th anniversary of the firm celebrated, and a permanent collection of original art, including work by Champaign County artists, hung in the firm's offices to honor the heritage of the company and the community.
 
Erected 2005 by Family of Charles F. Johnson III, Champaign County Bicentennial Historical Marker Committee, The Ohio Historical Society. (Marker Number 21-11.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Ohio Historical Society / The Ohio History Connection marker series.
 
Location. 40° 6.507′ N, 83° 45.548′ W. Marker is in Urbana, Ohio, in Champaign County. Marker is at the intersection of Miami Street (U.S. 36) and Storms Avenue, on the right when traveling east on Miami Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 605 Miami Street, Urbana OH 43078, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Mad River and Lake Erie Railroad (within shouting distance of this marker); Pennsylvania Railroad Depot (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Mad River and Lake Erie Railroad
The Johnson Manufacturing Company and Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., November 9, 2008
3. The Johnson Manufacturing Company and Marker
(about 400 feet away); Champaign County World War I Memorial (approx. 0.3 miles away); Dayton, Springfield, and Urbana Electric Railway (approx. 0.3 miles away); This tablet mark's the Site of Doolittle's Tavern (approx. 0.3 miles away); Champaign County Civil War Memorial (approx. 0.4 miles away); Billy "Single" Clifford /Clifford Theater (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Urbana.
 
Categories. 20th CenturyIndustry & CommerceRailroads & StreetcarsRoads & Vehicles
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 24, 2008, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 2,827 times since then and 106 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 24, 2008, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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