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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Indianapolis in Marion County, Indiana — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Camp Morton

1861–65

 
 
Camp Morton 1861-65 Marker image. Click for full size.
By M. Bowyer, July 22, 2007
1. Camp Morton 1861-65 Marker
Inscription. Site selected by Lew Wallace as training camp for volunteers on old State Fairgrounds in 1861 and named for Governor Oliver P. Morton. Used as a camp for Confederate prisoners, 1862-65. Col. Richard Owen, Commandant.
 
Erected 1962 by Indiana Civil War Centennial Commission. (Marker Number 49.1962.1.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Indiana State Historical Bureau Markers marker series.
 
Location. 39° 47.593′ N, 86° 9.134′ W. Marker is in Indianapolis, Indiana, in Marion County. Marker is on North Alabama Street. Touch for map. Located in front of the Herron-Morton Place Historic Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1900 block N. Alabama Street, Indianapolis IN 46202, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Robert F. Kennedy Speech on Death of Martin L. King ( approx. 0.4 miles away); Indiana Federation of Colored Womenís Clubs ( approx. half a mile away); Brig. General Benjamin Harrison ( approx. 0.6 miles away); The Home of Caroline Scott Harrison ( approx. 0.6 miles away); Ovid Butler, Sr. ( approx.
Herron-Morton Place Historic Park image. Click for full size.
By M. Bowyer, July 22, 2007
2. Herron-Morton Place Historic Park
0.7 miles away); The Old Northside ( approx. 0.7 miles away); North Western Christian University ( approx. 0.7 miles away); Widows and Orphans Friendsí Society ( approx. 0.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Indianapolis.
 
Also see . . .  Camp Morton:: (Courtesy: freepages.history.ancestry.com)::. “Camp Morton, an Indianapolis civil war training camp and later a federal prison for captured confederate soldiers, was located in the area now bounded by Talbott Avenue to the west, Central Avenue to the east, Twenty-Second Street to the north, and Nineteenth Street to the south. Samuel Henderson, the first mayor of Indianapolis, originally owned this thirty-six acre tract, which contained scattered hardwood trees of mostly black walnut and oak and at least four good springs. This area became known as Hendersonís or Otisí Grove. A creek flowed through this property upon which, after it was dredged in 1837, become known as State Ditch. State Ditch was later nicknamed the “Potomac” by the prisoners of Camp Morton. State Ditch is no longer visible as it was made into an underground drain some years after the war.” (Submitted on January 26, 2012.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Herron-Morton Place Historic Park image. Click for full size.
By M. Bowyer, July 22, 2007
3. Herron-Morton Place Historic Park
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 23, 2007, by M. Bowyer of Indianapolis, Indiana. This page has been viewed 2,038 times since then and 60 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 23, 2007, by M. Bowyer of Indianapolis, Indiana. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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