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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Tenleytown in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Fort Reno

Civil War Defenses of Washington

 

1861-1865

 
Fort Reno Marker image. Click for full size.
By F. Robby, July 7, 2009
1. Fort Reno Marker
Inscription. No visible evidence remains of Fort Reno, which stood at the top of this hill, the highest elevation in Washington, D.C.

[drawing of Fort Reno] Fort Reno from U.S. Army Corps of Engineers drawing. Cannon mounted at Fort Reno helped repulse a Confederate attack on Fort Stevens, July 11-12, 1864.

[map of northern DC] Other Civil War fort locations administered by Rock Creek Park.

[photo of unnamed Washington fort] During the Civil War, Washington's forts overlooked farm land.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Defenses of Washington marker series.
 
Location. 38° 57.055′ N, 77° 4.509′ W. Marker is in Tenleytown, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of Nebraska Avenue and Chesapeake Street, on the right when traveling south on Nebraska Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20016, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Three R's (within shouting distance of this marker); Suburban Style (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Fort Reno
Maj. Gen. Jesse L. Reno image. Click for full size.
Wikipedia
2. Maj. Gen. Jesse L. Reno
(about 600 feet away); a different marker also named Fort Reno (about 700 feet away); The Civil War Defenses of Washington (about 700 feet away); A Country Road (approx. mile away); In Touch with the World (approx. 0.3 miles away); On the Circle (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Tenleytown.
 
Also see . . .  MGen Jesse Lee Reno. (Submitted on March 13, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional comments.
1. Fort Reno Particulars
From "Mr. Lincoln's Forts: A Guide to the Civil War Defenses of Washington," by Benjamin Franklin Cooling III and Walton H. Owen II:

The fort was first named Fort Pennsylvania, but later renamed to honor Major General Jesse Reno, who was killed in the battle of South Mountain in September 1862. The fort covered the three roads that converged at Tennallytown, leading to Georgetown.

The fort had a perimeter of 517 yards, with 27 guns and mortars. The mounted guns included two 8-inch siege howitzers, nine 24-pdr howitzers,
Fort Reno Marker image. Click for full size.
By F. Robby, July 7, 2009
3. Fort Reno Marker
Looking west up the hill where Fort Reno was located.
one 100-pdr Parrott Rifle, four 30-pdr Parrott Rifles, two 10-inch mortars, and two 24-pdr Coehorn mortars. A battery to the north mounted seven more 20-pdr Parrott Rifles.

Units stationed at the fort included the 7th Pennsylvania Reserves (36th Infantry Regiment), 59th New York Infantry, 9th and 10th Rhode Island Infantry, and the 10th Rhode Island battery.

On July 11, 1864, portions of the 151st Ohio National Guard, 1st New Hampshire Heavy Artillery, and 9th New York Heavy Artillery occupied the fort while Confederates demonstrated in front of nearby Fort Stevens. (Some Confederates claim to have "scouted" into the fort prior to the arrival of these Federal forces, thus actually having entered the Washington defenses.)
    — Submitted July 13, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

 
Additional keywords. Highest Point in DC
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesNatural FeaturesWar, US Civil
 
Point Reno image. Click for full size.
By F. Robby, July 7, 2009
4. Point Reno
As described on the Fort Reno marker, about 1/10th mile up the hill is this marker in the ground indicating the highest natural elevation in Washington, D.C.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 11, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 7, 2009, by F. Robby of Baltimore, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,855 times since then and 44 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on July 7, 2009, by F. Robby of Baltimore, Maryland.   2. submitted on March 13, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   3, 4. submitted on July 7, 2009, by F. Robby of Baltimore, Maryland.
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