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Stockton in Hunterdon County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Mill Power System

 
 
Mill Power System Marker image. Click for full size.
By Alan Edelson, July 30, 2009
1. Mill Power System Marker
Inscription.
Power System in 1830
At the time that construction started on the Delaware and Raritan Canal, the power system of the Prallsville Mills worked as follows:

A dam across the Wickecheoke creek several hundred yards upstream of the mill site impounded water in the Upper Mill Pond. Water flowed via the headrace to the Lower Mill Pond whose elevation was higher than the elevation of the surrounding landscape so that the water could fall onto the mill's waterwheels. From the lower millpond, water was directed through races into the grist mill, saw mill, and oil mill. The exhaust water from the saw and grist mills exited directly into the Wickecheoke Creek; exhaust water from the oil mill was released into a small stream emtying into the Delaware River. (The locations of the saw mill and the main road through the mill complex are hypothetical. The present-day Route 29 passes between the store - now a house - and the site of the Lower Mill Pond.)
Power Saystem After 1834
When the Delaware and Raritan Canal was built in 1834 it intercepted the Wickecheoke Creek just before the creek entered the Delaware River. The canal also caused the creek's water level to be raised behind the Grist Mill by 8 to 10 feet, making it impossible for the mill to discharge exhaust water to
Prallsville Mills image. Click for full size.
By Alan Edelson, July 30, 2009
2. Prallsville Mills
the creek. The Canal Company agreed to provide canal water to the mill and built a stone culvert under the canal to carry exhaust water directly to the Delaware River.

The Canal Company's agreement to supply enough water to power 3 millstones - 4 if it could be done at no harm to the canal - was a tremendous opportunity for the Prallsville Mill. Canal water was more plentiful than the creek water, and it was a far more reliable source than a creek that could nearly run dry during even mild droughts and would often freeze over in the winter.
 
Location. 40° 24.571′ N, 74° 59.151′ W. Marker is in Stockton, New Jersey, in Hunterdon County. Marker is on New Jersey Route 29, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Stockton NJ 08559, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Grist Mill (here, next to this marker); Delaware & Raritan Canal State Park (within shouting distance of this marker); Stockton (approx. 0.4 miles away); Bridge Street (approx. half a mile away); Belvidere Delaware Railroad (approx. half a mile away); Stockton Railroad (approx. half a mile away); Stockton Inn (approx. half a mile away); Centre Bridge (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Stockton.
 
Also see . . .
Prallsville Mills - Canal Side image. Click for full size.
By Alan Edelson, July 30, 2009
3. Prallsville Mills - Canal Side
 History of the Prallsville Mills. "Daniel Howell built a wooden grist mill at the juncture of the Wickeckeoke Creek and the Delaware River circa 1720. It prospered under a succession of owners through the 18th Century and was sold to John Prall, Jr. in 1794." (Submitted on August 3, 2009.) 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceWaterways & Vessels
 
Prallsville Mills - Wickecheoke Spillway to Delaware River image. Click for full size.
By Alan Edelson, July 30, 2009
4. Prallsville Mills - Wickecheoke Spillway to Delaware River
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 31, 2009, by Alan Edelson of Union Twsp., New Jersey. This page has been viewed 525 times since then and 12 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on July 31, 2009, by Alan Edelson of Union Twsp., New Jersey. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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