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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Pennsville in Salem County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Finnís Point National Cemetery

 
 
Finnís Point National Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 12, 2009
1. Finnís Point National Cemetery Marker
Inscription. Though located far from any site of armed conflict, Finnís Point National Cemetery exists as a direct result of the American Civil War. It is the resting place for the remains of 2,436 Confederate soldiers whose military careers ended as prisoners of war under the Union forces. These men were interned 1½ miles from here at Fort Delaware on Pea Patch Island. One hundred thirty-five Union soldiers who died while serving as guards at the prison camp, are also buried here.

Additional Interments
A few interments have been made for members of the U.S. Armed Forces from the Spanish-American War, World War I, and soldiers who served at nearby Fort Mott when it was an active military installation. In the northwest corner, 13 white marble headstones mark the burial place of German prisoners of World War II who died while in custody at Fort Dix, New Jersey. The cemetery is now closed for future interments except for cremated remains.
 
Erected by State of New Jersey Division of Parks & Forestry and National Park System.
 
Location. 39° 36.633′ N, 75° 33.332′ W. Marker is in Pennsville, New Jersey, in Salem County. Marker is on Cemetery Road, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker
Markers in Finnís Point National Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 12, 2009
2. Markers in Finnís Point National Cemetery
Finnís Point National Cemetery is part of the New Jersey Coastal Heritage Trail Route. The Finnís Point marker is on the left, while the other marker describes the New Jersey Coastal Heritage Trail program.
is near the parking lot at the entrance to the cemetery. Marker is in this post office area: Pennsville NJ 08070, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Union Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Finnís Point National Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); Gettysburg Address (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Confederate Monument (about 400 feet away); 1872 Construction (approx. 0.4 miles away); Peace Magazine: † 1904 (approx. 0.4 miles away); Battery Krayenbuhlís 5-inch rapid fire guns (approx. 0.4 miles away); Ammunition Hoist (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Pennsville.
 
More about this marker. Several photographs appear at the bottom of the marker. The first, provided by the Delaware State Archives, is a picture of Fort Delaware taken during its use as a prison camp. It has a caption of “The death toll among prisoners of war and the guards at Fort Delaware was high, especially in the latter part of 1863 and throughout 1864. By July of 1863, there were 12,595 prisoners on the island. It was considered a grim place and acquired a frightening reputation. Disease was rampant and nearly 2,700 prisoners died from
Finnís Point National Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 12, 2009
3. Finnís Point National Cemetery
Finn's Point National Cemetery in Killcohook National Refuge, near Fort Mott State Park.
malnutrition and neglect.” Next to this is a photograph of the Confederate Monument, with the caption “In the northwest corner of the cemetery is the Confederate Monument – a granite obelisk approximately fifty feet high, with commemorative plaques identifying Confederate soldiers who died while interned at Fort Delaware.” The last photograph depicts the Union Monument, and has a caption of “A stone tablet pillar and ornamental pyramid in the center of the domed marble Union Monument immortalizes 105 of the Union dead who died while serving duty on Pea Patch Island. The tablet also indicates that the remains of another thirty Union soldiers could not be identified.” The bottom right of the marker also contains a map showing the cemetery orientation of Finnís Point Cemetery. Indicated on the map are the locations of the Union and Confederate Monuments and burials, the German POW burials, the office, flagpole and the site of the marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. Finn's Point National Cemetery. Fort Delaware Society. (Submitted on August 15, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. New Jersey Coastal Heritage Trail Route. National Park Service website. (Submitted on August 15, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. War, Spanish-AmericanWar, US CivilWar, World IWar, World II
 
Union Monument image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 12, 2009
4. Union Monument
This marble monument, located just in front of the marker, honors the 105 Union soldiers who died while serving on Pea Patch Island.
Confederate Monument image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 12, 2009
5. Confederate Monument
This fifty foot granite obelisk honors the 2,436 Confederate soldiers who died as prisoners of war at Fort Delaware.
German POW Graves image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 12, 2009
6. German POW Graves
German prisoners of war who died while being held at nearby Fort Dix, NJ during World War II are also buried at Finn's Point Cemetery.
Finnís Point National Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 12, 2009
7. Finnís Point National Cemetery
This National Cemetery
has been listed in
The National Register
of
Historic Places
by the
United States Department of the Interior
1978
Prisoner Barracks at Fort Delaware image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 12, 2009
8. Prisoner Barracks at Fort Delaware
Most of the Confederate prisoners who are buried in Finn's Point National Cemetery died in barracks like this one on Pea Patch Island.
Inside Confederate Prison Barracks image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 12, 2009
9. Inside Confederate Prison Barracks
Hundreds of Confederate prisoners crowded into a barracks such as this. Disease and malnutrition killed many, who were then laid to rest in Finn's Point Cemetery.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 15, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 2,244 times since then and 33 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on August 15, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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