Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Richmond, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Arthur Ashe Monument

 

—Monument Avenue Historic District —

 
Arthur Ashe Monument, east side inscription image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, September 27, 2009
1. Arthur Ashe Monument, east side inscription
Inscription. [Inscription on east face of monument:]
Arthur R. Ashe, Jr.
1943 - 1993

World Champion, Author, Humanitarian,
Founder of Virginia Heroes, Incorporated,
Native of Richmond, Virginia.
This Monument was placed at
Monument Avenue and Roseneath
Road on July 10, 1996,
to inspire children and people of all nationalities.

[Inscription on west face of monument:]
Since we are surrounded by
so great a crowd of witnesses,
let us lay aside every weight, and
the sin which so easily ensnares us.
and let us run with endurance
the race that is set before us.

                    Hebrews 12:1

 
Erected 1996.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Historic Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 37° 33.91′ N, 77° 28.744′ W. Marker is in Richmond, Virginia. Marker is at the intersection of Monument Avenue and Roseneath Road, in the median on Monument Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is in the city's "Museum District" and the Monument Avenue Historic District, two blocks southwest of Broad Street (U.S. Rte 33/250) and southeast of I-195. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3321 Monument Avenue, Richmond VA 23221, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Arthur Ashe Monument, west side inscription image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, September 27, 2009
2. Arthur Ashe Monument, west side inscription
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Second Line of the Confederate Defenses (within shouting distance of this marker); Maury (approx. 0.3 miles away); Stonewall Jackson (approx. half a mile away); Memorial Bell Tower (approx. 0.6 miles away); The Home For Needy Confederate Women (approx. 0.6 miles away); Virginia Historical Society (approx. 0.6 miles away); Robinson House (approx. 0.6 miles away); Residential Life at R. E. Lee Camp, No.1 (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Richmond.
 
More about this marker. At the base of this marker is a Register of National Historic Places marker for the Monument Avenue Historic District. The Monument Avenue Historic District is also registered as a National Historic Landmark.
 
Also see . . .
1. Wikipedia entry for Arthur Ashe. (Submitted on September 28, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
2. Arthur Ashe. A Monumental Man?. (Submitted on September 28, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
3. Wikipedia entry for Monument Avenue. (Submitted on September 28, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
4. Take a tour of the monuments on “America’s Most Beautiful Boulevard.”. (Submitted on October 2, 2009.)
 
Additional keywords.
Arthur Ashe, sculpture by Paul De Pasquale, image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, September 27, 2009
3. Arthur Ashe, sculpture by Paul De Pasquale,
Atop the monument at Roseneath Road.
Tennis; U.S. Open; AIDS; Paul De Pasquale, sculptor.
 
Categories. 20th CenturyAfrican AmericansHeroesNotable PersonsSports
 
Arthur Ashe Monument. image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, September 27, 2009
4. Arthur Ashe Monument.
Arthur Ashe Monument image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, September 27, 2009
5. Arthur Ashe Monument
Arthur Ashe Monument image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, September 27, 2009
6. Arthur Ashe Monument
view from the east near Historic District marker.
Monument Avenue Historic District /National Register of Historic Places marker, image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, September 27, 2009
7. Monument Avenue Historic District /National Register of Historic Places marker,
in the grass at the curb east of the Arthur Ashe monument
Arthur Ashe image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 25, 2017
8. Arthur Ashe
This 1993 portrait of Arthur Ashe (1943-1993) by Louis Briel hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“Armed with superb natural talent, a keen competitive spirit, and poise that set him apart from his rivals, Arthur Ashe made his way from the segregated playground courts of his youth to the pinnacle of the tennis world. Rated among the world's top ten players while still in college, Ashe reached the number-one ranking in spectacular fashion in 1968. After capturing the U.S. amateur title, he served an astonishing twenty-six aces in the final to become the first African American man to claim the U.S. Open championship. Ashe went on to record multiple tournament victories, including his memorable triumph over Jimmy Connors at Wimbledon in 1975. Following a heart attack that forced his retirement in 1980, Ashe dedicated his energies to humanitarian causes. He became a leader in the fight against AIDS in 1992, after revealing that he had contracted the virus through a transfusion” — National Portrait Gallery
Monument Avenue Historic District marker near Arthur Ashe Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, July 2, 2015
9. Monument Avenue Historic District marker near Arthur Ashe Monument Marker
This small concrete block with two markers is directly southeast of the Arthur Ashe monument along Monument Avenue. The first marker says "The American Institute of Certified Planners has designated The Monument Avenue Historic District, Richmond, Virginia as a National Historic Planning Landmark. Erected 1991. The Society for American City and Regional Planning History, The American Institute of Certified Planners, and The Virginia Chapter, American Planning Association." The second, lower marker states that "The Monument Avenue Historic District has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior."
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 19, 2017. This page originally submitted on September 28, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,360 times since then and 101 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on September 28, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   7. submitted on September 29, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   8. submitted on September 16, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   9. submitted on February 15, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement