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Charleston in Kanawha County, West Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Thomas J. Jackson

“Stonewall”

 
 
South Side, Thomas J. Jackson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, October 3, 2009
1. South Side, Thomas J. Jackson Marker
Inscription. [South Side]
Born Jan. 21, 1824
Clarksburg, VA.
Now West Virginia,
Confederate General
Died May 10, 1863

[East Side]
This monument first located on original state capitol grounds Sept. 27, 1910; relocated to the present state capitol grounds July 25, 1926. Relocated in the state capitol complex to its present position, July 20, 1976.

[North Side]
Replacement stone
A memorial to Samuel S. Green S.G.T. Montgomery's
Batt'y, Cutshaw's, Batt'n, L.A. C.S.A.
Brig. Gen. W.VA. Div. U.C.V.

[West Side]
Jackson
Stonewall

Erected as a
memorial
to the
Confederate
soldiers
1861-1865
by
Charleston
chapter
no. 151
United Daughters
of the Confederacy.

 
Erected 1910.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the United Daughters of the Confederacy marker series.
 
Location. 38° 20.127′ N, 81° 36.675′ W. Marker is in Charleston, West Virginia, in Kanawha County. Marker is at the intersection of Kanawha Boulevard and California Avenue, on the left when traveling east on Kanawha Boulevard. Touch for map. Marker located
Thomas J. Jackson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, October 3, 2009
2. Thomas J. Jackson Marker
East Side
on State Capitol Grounds. Marker is in this post office area: Charleston WV 25311, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The New Deal In Your Community (within shouting distance of this marker); Booker Taliaferro Washington (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Abraham Lincoln Walks At Midnight (about 400 feet away); State Capitol (about 400 feet away); West Virginia Home Guards (about 600 feet away); Union Civil War Monument (about 800 feet away); "The West Virginia Coal Miner" (approx. 0.2 miles away); Executive Mansion (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Charleston.
 
Regarding Thomas J. Jackson. The statue was commissioned and erected by the Charleston Chapter No. 151, United Daughters of the
Confederacy. The marble for the base was quarried at Genoa; the bronze statue cast in Italy. A replacement stone was later added to the statue in memory of Brigadier General Samuel Green, who was a West Virginian fighting for the Confederacy during the Civil War. This monument was first placed on the lawn of the Old Capitol Building. The Old Capitol Building burned in Jan. 1921 and the monument was relocated on July 25, 1926 to the grounds of the new Capitol, then under construction.
Thomas J. Jackson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, October 3, 2009
3. Thomas J. Jackson Marker
North Side
In 1976, it was relocated to its current site on the new Capitol grounds. At that time, the statue was restored and turned on its bronze plinth to face Kanawha Boulevard. It now faces away from the original stone base inscription.
Smithsonian American Art Museum Control Number Inventory of American Sculpture 76005913
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Thomas J. Jackson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, October 3, 2009
4. Thomas J. Jackson Marker
West Side
Thomas J. Jackson Marker, west side UDC tribute image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 18, 2011
5. Thomas J. Jackson Marker, west side UDC tribute
Thomas J. Jackson Marker, west side image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 18, 2011
6. Thomas J. Jackson Marker, west side
Thomas J. Jackson , Artist: Sir Moses Jacob Ezekiel , 1844-1917, sculptor. image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 18, 2011
7. Thomas J. Jackson , Artist: Sir Moses Jacob Ezekiel , 1844-1917, sculptor.
Thomas J. Jackson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, October 3, 2009
8. Thomas J. Jackson Marker
<i>View from Capitol Grounds Showing Stonewall Jackson Monument, Y.M.C.A and Day & Night Bank </i> image. Click for full size.
By S. Spencer Moore, Co., circa 1917
9. View from Capitol Grounds Showing Stonewall Jackson Monument, Y.M.C.A and Day & Night Bank
Historical postcard view showing the monument in its original location.
Thomas Jonathan Jackson image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 16, 2015
10. Thomas Jonathan Jackson
This 1864 portrait of Thomas J. Jackson by J. W. King hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“At the First Battle of Manassas in July 18th, the unrelenting vigor with which Confederate General Thomas Jonathan Jackson held his position inspired a general nearby to rally his troops with the cry, ‘There is Jackson standing like a stone wall.’ From that moment on, he was known as ‘Stonewall’ Jackson, a name that he repeatedly lived up to, fighting under the command of General Robert E. Lee.

The deeply religious Jackson believed intensely in the righteousness of the southern cause, and a key to his success was his ability to instill his own fighting fervor in his men. One of his most brilliant victories came at Chancellorsville in the spring of 1863. Tragically for Jackson and the South, this would prove to be his last battle, as he died of wounds accidentally inflicted by his own men.” — National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 5, 2009, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,073 times since then and 24 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on October 5, 2009, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina.   5, 6, 7. submitted on May 19, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   8. submitted on October 5, 2009, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina.   9. submitted on November 1, 2014.   10. submitted on September 1, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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