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Greeneville in Greene County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Death of Gen. John Hunt Morgan

“... bring Morgan out dead or alive.”

 
 
Death of Gen. John Hunt Morgan Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 27, 2009
1. Death of Gen. John Hunt Morgan Marker
Inscription. On September 3-4, 1864, Lt.Col. William H. Ingerton led the 13th Tennessee Cavalry (USA) to Greeneville's outskirts, where he learned that Gen.John Hunt Morgan was at the Dickson-Williams Mansion. He told his company commanders, Capts. C.C. Wilcox and S.E. Northington, "to dash into town, surround the Williams residence and bring Morgan out dead or alive."

The Federal cavalry surprised the Confederates. Some escaped on their horses while many others were shot or captured. Nicknamed the Thunderbolt of the Confederacy, Morgan bolted from the house and searched for an escape route. His officers urged him to remain in the mansion and await reinforcements. Morgan refused: "The boys can not get here in time. The Yankees will never take me prisoner again." Morgan and his staff officers ran to St.James Episcopal Church nearby, where they hid under the floor until Morgan heard Union soldiers enter the church. He then rushed out toward the grape arbors here near the Williams's stables and his horse, Sir Oliver. As Wilcox's troopers surrounded the area, Morgan tried to walk away in the confusion. Union Pvt. Andrew J. Campbell ordered him to halt, and when Morgan failed to obey the order, Campbell shot and killed him.

The death of Morgan was a blow to the morale of Confederates in East Tennessee and throughout the South.

(Sidebar):
Death of Gen. John Hunt Morgan Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 4, 2012
2. Death of Gen. John Hunt Morgan Marker

After local residents viewed Morgan's body at the Dickson-William Mansion, the remains were returned to his wife, Mattie Ready Morgan, in Abingdon, Virginia. Morgan's funeral was the largest Abingdon had ever seen. His body was interred in a stone tomb in Sinking Spring Cemetery, then removed after a few days and taken by rail to Richmond, where he had a Confederate state funeral in the Capitol. He was again placed in a stone tomb, this time in Hollywood Cemetery. In April 1868, Morgan's remains were taken to Lexington, Kentucky, where more than 2,000 mourners attended his third and final funeral. Afterward, the veterans formed the Morgan's Men Association. Morgan rests today in the Hunt-Morgan plot in Lexington Cemetery.
 
Erected by Tennessee Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Tennessee Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 36° 9.86′ N, 82° 49.915′ W. Marker is in Greeneville, Tennessee, in Greene County. Marker is on West Church Street, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 169 West Church Street, Greeneville TN 37743, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Dickson - Williams Mansion (here, next to this marker); General Morgan Inn
Death of Gen. John Hunt Morgan Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 4, 2012
3. Death of Gen. John Hunt Morgan Marker
Two Civil War Trails markers are found at this location in front of the Dickson-Williams Mansion. The Death of Gen. John Hunt Morgan marker is seen here on the left.
(within shouting distance of this marker); Death of John Morgan (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Dickson - Williams Mansion (within shouting distance of this marker); Opera House (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Greenville Cumberland Presbyterian Church (about 400 feet away); First Presbyterian Church (about 400 feet away); John H. Morgan (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Greeneville.
 
More about this marker. The marker displays portraits of General Morgan and his wife Mattie.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Gen. John Hunt Morgan image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 27, 2009
4. Gen. John Hunt Morgan
Gen. John Hunt Morgan and his favorite horse, Black Bess image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 27, 2009
5. Gen. John Hunt Morgan and his favorite horse, Black Bess
Mattie R. Morgan image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 27, 2009
6. Mattie R. Morgan
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 7, 2009, by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 3,245 times since then and 87 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on October 7, 2009, by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina.   2, 3. submitted on August 8, 2012, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   4, 5, 6. submitted on October 7, 2009, by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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