Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Weaverville in Buncombe County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Brothers In Service

Zebulon and Robert Vance Brithplace

 
 
Brothers In Service Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 26, 2009
1. Brothers In Service Marker
Inscription. Here were born two notable Buncombe County brothers, Zebulon Baird Vance (1830-1894) and Robert Brank Vance (1828-1899).

Zebulon Vance was a Whig and supporter of the Union who opposed secession until the last moment. At the outbreak of war in 1861, he reigned his seat in the U.S. House of Representatives, returned home, and raised the "Rough and Ready Guards" (Co. F, 14th North Carolina Infantry) for the Confederate army. Elected colonel of the 26th North Carolina Infantry, Vance served in the field until elected governor in 1862. His administration was marked by efforts to balance the needs of his people with those of the Confederacy, promising "the wife & child of the soldiers who are in the Army doing his duty, shall share the last bushel of meal & pound of meat in the State." His leadership and concern for North Carolinians ensured his place in their hearts. At war's end, on his 35th birthday, he was arrested and briefly imprisoned in Washington, D.C. Pardoned in 1867, he was reelected governor in 1876, and then elected to the U.S. Senate in 1879. He died in office in 1894. Vance remains to this day the most popular leader that North Carolina has produced.

Robert Vance, who like his brother maintained strong Unionist sympathies, volunteered for Confederate military service in 1861 when North Carolina seceded. He
Zebulon B. Vance image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, June 26, 2009
2. Zebulon B. Vance
was elected colonel of the 29th North Carolina Infantry and later was promoted to brigadier general commanding Confederate forces in western North Carolina. Despite geographical obstacles he and his men succeeded in moving artillery through the Smoky Mountains. He was captured by Union forces in East Tennessee in 1864, then paroled by order of President Lincoln and allowed to return home. In 1872, he was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives, serving until retirement in 1896.

"If war should come, I preferred to be with my own people. ...[I]t was better, right or wrong, that communities and States should go together and face the horror of war in a body."
Zebulon B. Vance, North Carolina's Civil War Governor
 
Erected by Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the North Carolina Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 35° 42.061′ N, 82° 29.762′ W. Marker is near Weaverville, North Carolina, in Buncombe County. Marker is on Reems Creek Road (State Highway 1003), on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 911 Reems Creek Road, Weaverville NC 28787, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Weaver College (approx. 3.8
Robert B. Vance image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 26, 2009
3. Robert B. Vance
miles away); Zebulon B. Vance (approx. 4.5 miles away); David L. Swain (approx. 5.9 miles away); Francis Asbury (approx. 5.9 miles away); Joseph Lane (approx. 5.9 miles away); Kiffin Y. Rockwell (approx. 7.2 miles away); Battle of Asheville (approx. 7.3 miles away); The University of North Carolina at Asheville (approx. 7.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Weaverville.
 
Also see . . .  Vance Birthplace State Historic Site. (Submitted on October 10, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Vance Birthplace Historic Site image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 26, 2009
4. Vance Birthplace Historic Site
Vance Birthplace Historic Site image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 26, 2009
5. Vance Birthplace Historic Site
Vance Birthplace Historic Site image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 26, 2009
6. Vance Birthplace Historic Site
Vance Birthplace Historic Site image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 26, 2009
7. Vance Birthplace Historic Site
The site is often used for living history displays.
Vance Birthplace Historic Site image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 26, 2009
8. Vance Birthplace Historic Site
Bathtub image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 26, 2009
9. Bathtub
Bathtub image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 26, 2009
10. Bathtub
Brothers In Service Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 26, 2009
11. Brothers In Service Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 9, 2009, by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,041 times since then and 29 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. submitted on October 9, 2009, by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement