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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Waterbury in New Haven County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

John Lyman Chatfield

 
 
John Lyman Chatfield Monument image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, October 6, 2009
1. John Lyman Chatfield Monument
[ West face of the pedestal ]
Inscription.
John Lyman Chatfield
Col. 6th Conn. Vols.
Born at Oxford, Sept. 13, 1826
Died at Waterbury, Aug. 9, 1863
From Wounds
Received at Fort Wagner
“Fidus ad Extremum.”
( Faithful to the end )

 
Location. 41° 32.92′ N, 73° 3.002′ W. Marker is in Waterbury, Connecticut, in New Haven County. Marker is on Riverside Street 0.1 miles south of Sunnyside Avenue, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Located in Riverside Cemetery. Marker is in this post office area: Waterbury CT 06708, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Dedicated to the Memory of the Unknown Dead (within shouting distance of this marker); Revolutionary War Tercentennial Memorial (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Pearl Harbor Memorial Bridge (approx. 0.3 miles away); Harrub Pilgrim Memorial (approx. 0.4 miles away); First Settlement of Waterbury (approx. 0.4 miles away); They Did Not Come Home (approx. 0.4 miles away); Great War For Democracy Memorial (approx. 0.4 miles away); World War I Memorial (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Waterbury.
 
More about this marker. The statue gazes in the
John Lyman Chatfield Monument image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, October 6, 2009
2. John Lyman Chatfield Monument
direction of the monument "Dedicated to the Memory of the Unknown Dead". Gravestones bearing initials of other members of the Chatfield family surround the monument.
 
Regarding John Lyman Chatfield. John Lyman Chatfield served during the Civil War as Colonel and commander of the 6th Connecticut Volunteer Infantry, and was mortally wounded storming Fort Wagner in South Carolina. He went home after his wounding to recover, but went back too soon and died of gangrene as a result.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
John Lyman Chatfield Monument image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, October 6, 2009
3. John Lyman Chatfield Monument
Sculptor’s Mark
South face of the Pedestal image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, October 6, 2009
4. South face of the Pedestal
Minnie Chatfield Bates
Daughter of
John L. & Sylvia A. Chatfield
Mar. 23, 1858 – Jan. 29, 1897
Sylvia Chatfield Bates
Feb. 23, 1882 – Apr. 8, 1968
East face of the Pedestal image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, October 6, 2009
5. East face of the Pedestal
William Edward Brown
March 29, 1877 – May 8, 1950
Pauline Ainsworth Bates
Wife of
William E. Brown
Oct. 21, 1884 –
North face of the Pedestal image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, October 6, 2009
6. North face of the Pedestal
Sylvia Ann Wadsworth
Wife of
John Lyman Chatfield
July 8, 1828 – Jan. 7,1917
“Fidus ad Extremum.”
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 14, 2009, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 1,131 times since then and 28 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on October 14, 2009, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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