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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Parsons in Tucker County, West Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Corrick's Ford

 
 
Corrick's Ford Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, October 11, 2009
1. Corrick's Ford Marker
Inscription. After the Confederate defeat in the Tygarts Valley early in 1861, Gen. R.S. Garnett, the Southern leader, withdrew. Here he was overtaken by Federals under his West Point classmate, Gen. T.A. Morris, his army defeated and himself mortally wounded.
 
Location. 39° 5.288′ N, 79° 41.11′ W. Marker is in Parsons, West Virginia, in Tucker County. Marker is on Main Street (U.S. 219), on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Parsons WV 26287, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Corricks Ford (here, next to this marker); Corricks Ford Battlefield (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Corricks Ford Battlefield (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Corricks Ford (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Corrick House (about 600 feet away); a different marker also named Corricks Ford Battlefield (approx. mile away); Parsons / Corrick's Ford (approx. 0.6 miles away); Williams v. Board of Education Case (approx. 0.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Parsons.
 
Also see . . .  Battle of Corrick's Ford. Overview of the battle.
Corrick's Ford Markers image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, October 11, 2009
2. Corrick's Ford Markers
(Submitted on October 25, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Corrick's Ford image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, October 11, 2009
3. Corrick's Ford
Looking from the marker location toward the area of Corrick's Ford over Shavers Fork. The gray area on the near side bank is actually a modern embankment to reduce erosion. Below the marker location on the road runs the Allegheny Highlands Trail, an old railroad bed that crosses through next the river. The beside the trail is a marker further explaining the battle. The railroad line dated to the early 20th century, and did not factor into the battle.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 25, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 789 times since then and 51 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 25, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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