Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Greeneville in Greene County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Andrew Johnson

National Historic Site

 

—Andrew Johnson National Cemetery —

 
Andrew Johnson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 27, 2009
1. Andrew Johnson Marker
Inscription. Welcome to the Andrew Johnson National Historic Site. This site commemorates the life and work of the seventeenth president of the United States, Andrew Johnson. Born in poverty, Johnson rose from Greeneville tailor to the nation's highest office. His political philosophy was based upon a strict interpretation of the Constitution, a belief in states' rights, an unshakable commitment to serve the workingman, and a conservative attitude toward government spending. Johnson's presidency, including the impeachment and acquittal, occurred during the chaotic aftermath of the Civil War.

Four separate locations make up the Andrew Johnson National Historic Site. These include an Early Home, the Visitor Center, the Andrew Johnson Homestead, and the Andrew Johnson National Cemetery.

Follow the signs to the Visitor Center parking lot to begin your tour of an Early Home.

The Homestead is furnished with family furniture and memorabilia. Tickets for guided tours of the Homestead are available at the Visitor Center.

Andrew Johnson National Cemetery

When I die, I want no more winding sheet than that of the brave old flag...and no softer pillow than the Constitution of my country.

These are the words of Andrew Johnson who was buried atop this hill in 1875 wrapped in a United States
Andrew Johnson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 12, 2012
2. Andrew Johnson Marker
flag, with a copy of the Constitution resting beneath his head. His wife Eliza is buried beside him under this stately monument erected by the family in 1878. Their immediate family members and many descendants are also buried in this family plot.

The president's burial site was designated a national cemetery in 1906. The War Department developed and maintained it until 1942. Its management was then transferred to the National Park Service and it became a part of the Andrew Johnson National Historic Site.
 
Location. 36° 9.33′ N, 82° 50.258′ W. Marker is in Greeneville, Tennessee, in Greene County. Marker is on Monument Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 121 Monument Avenue, Greeneville TN 37743, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Andrew Johnson and Eliza Johnson Grave Marker (a few steps from this marker); Andrew Johnson National Cemetery (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Gettysburg Address (about 400 feet away); Greene County / Hawkins County (approx. 0.4 miles away); Classic American La France (approx. 0.4 miles away); McKee Street "Flagship of Greeneville Mayoralty"
Andrew Johnson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 12, 2012
3. Andrew Johnson Marker
The grave of Andrew Johnson can be seen behind the marker.
(approx. 0.4 miles away); Andrew Johnson Homestead (approx. half a mile away); Preserving the President’s Legacy (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Greeneville.
 
Also see . . .  A Short History of the (Andrew Johnson) National Cemetery. (Submitted on November 2, 2009.)
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesNotable Persons
 
Andrew Johnson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 27, 2009
4. Andrew Johnson Marker
A picture taken at Andrew Johnson's funeral is featured in the lower right of the marker.
Andrew Johnson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 27, 2009
5. Andrew Johnson Marker
The family erected a tall obelisk over Andrew and Eliza Johnson’s grave in 1878. There was a dedication ceremony, and afterwards, this became known as “Monument Hill.”
Andrew Johnson Grave Monument image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 27, 2009
6. Andrew Johnson Grave Monument
Andrew Johnson Grave Monument image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 27, 2009
7. Andrew Johnson Grave Monument
Andrew Johnson Grave Monument image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 27, 2009
8. Andrew Johnson Grave Monument
Andrew Johnson Grave Monument image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 27, 2009
9. Andrew Johnson Grave Monument
Andrew Johnson, seventeenth President of the United States. Born Dec. 29, 1808, died July 31, 1875. His faith in the people never wavered.
Eliza Johnson, Born Oct 4, 1810, died Jan, 15, 1876. In memory of our father and mother.
Caretaker's House image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 27, 2009
10. Caretaker's House
at the Andrew Johnson National Cemetery
Address by President Lincold at the Dedication of the Gettysburg National Cemetery November 19,1863 image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 27, 2009
11. Address by President Lincold at the Dedication of the Gettysburg National Cemetery November 19,1863
President Lincoln's Gettysburg Address is a common fixture at all National Cemeteries.
President Lincoln's Gettysburg Address Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, September 27, 2009
12. President Lincoln's Gettysburg Address Plaque
on the front of the Caretaker's House.
Andrew Johnson image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 16, 2015
13. Andrew Johnson
This portrait by Washington B. Cooper hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington DC.

“A onetime tailor whose wife had taught him to read, Andrew Johnson had a gift for public speaking that launched him on a successful political career leading to a Senate seat in 1856. In 1864, Abraham Lincoln, in a gesture of unity, chose Johnson — a southern Democrat from Tennessee but a staunch defender of the Union — as his running mate. When Johnson succeeded to the presidency after Lincoln's assassination in April 1865, it became clear that his view of Reconstruction, which would return power to the white southern planters and allow returning southern states to deprive freed slaves of their rights, clashed not only with Lincoln's views but with the Republican majority in Congress. The resultant clash led to his impeachment, from which he survived conviction by only one vote.

Washington B. Cooper was a leading Tennessee portraitist, and Johnson sat for him on several occasions. Although this likeness is undated, Johnson's apparent age in the picture suggests that it was painted during his presidency.” — National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 26, 2009, by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,383 times since then and 41 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on October 26, 2009, by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina.   2, 3. submitted on August 13, 2012, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12. submitted on October 26, 2009, by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina.   13. submitted on March 27, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement