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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near McConnells in York County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Field of Huck's Defeat

 
 
Field of Huck's Defeat Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, November 14, 2009
1. Field of Huck's Defeat Marker
Inscription.
[Front Marker]
Where 75 Whigs led by
Colonel William Bratton
defeated a British and Tory
force of 500 men
July 12, 1780.

On this date, Sept.30, 1953, there stands 200 feet to the north of this stone, the Revolutionary home of Col. William Bratton and his wife, Martha. The land was a grant under George the Third.

[Rear Marker]
To the memory of
Mrs. Martha Bratton
wife of
Col. William Bratton
----------
Loyal in the face of death.
Brave in the hour of danger.
Merciful in the moment of victory.

 
Erected 1902 by Kings Mountain Chapter-Daughters of the American Revolution.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution marker series.
 
Location. 34° 51.93′ N, 81° 10.535′ W. Marker is near McConnells, South Carolina, in York County. Marker is on Brattonsville Road 0.3 miles north of Percival Road, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Mc Connells SC 29726, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Battle of Huck’s Defeat (here, next to this marker); William Bratton Plantation/Battle of Huck's Defeat
Field of Huck's Defeat Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, November 14, 2009
2. Field of Huck's Defeat Marker
Rear side
(a few steps from this marker); Backwoods Cabin (within shouting distance of this marker); Brick Kitchen (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Homestead (about 300 feet away); Bratton Home (about 300 feet away); Brattonsville (about 300 feet away); A House of Untold Stories (about 500 feet away); Huck's Defeat (approx. 0.7 miles away); Bethesda Presbyterian Church (approx. 2.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in McConnells.
 
More about this marker. Marker is part of Brattonsville Historic Site and is partially obscured by a wood fence.
 
Also see . . .
1. Brattonsville Historic District. Brattonsville is a small but important area of York County significant for its architectural record of South Carolina development. (Submitted on January 10, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Historic Brattonsville. Historic Brattonsville is a 775-acre American Revolution living history site and is a member
Field of Huck's Defeat Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, November 14, 2009
3. Field of Huck's Defeat Marker
of the Culture & Heritage Museums of York County, South Carolina. (Submitted on January 10, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. The Battle of Williamson's Plantation (Huck's Defeat). The Battle of Huck's Defeat was a significant turning point for the back country during the American Revolution. (Submitted on January 10, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. Battle of Williamson's Plantation (Huck's Defeat). Huck’s Defeat or the Battle of Williamson's Plantation was an engagement of the American Revolutionary War that occurred in present York County, South Carolina on July 12, 1780, and was one of the first battles of the southern campaign to be won by Patriot militia. (Submitted on January 10, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Williamson's Plantation/Huck's Defeat
Date: July 12, 1780
Location: Brattonsville, York County
Commanders: Col. William Bratton, Capt. John McClure; Capt. Christian Huck
Casualties: American-1k, 1w; British-36k, 29c

Although the British now solidified their presence in South Carolina with outposts all along the midlands, partisan leaders managed to keep up a constant harassment. Thomas Sumter was knocking at the back door of the British stronghold at Rocky Mount and, in response, the commander there sent Capt. Christian Huck of Tarleton's Legion to deal with the Patriots. Huck ravaged the countryside on his way to Hill's Iron Works, where he destroyed this valuable source of munitions and farm implements. Col. William Hill joined with Capt. John McClure, Col. William Bratton (who had defeated a band of Tories at Mobley's Meeting House), and Capt. Edward Lacey to engage Captain Huck, who would be camped at Williamson's Plantation.

On his way to Williamson's, Huck and his officers had struck terror in the hearts of local residents. At Captain McClure's house, Huck found two young men melting pewter dishes to make bullets for the Patriot cause. Huck dumped the boys in a corn crib and told them they would be hanged the next morning. When Mrs. McClure protested, he struck her with his sword and they rode off to Colonel Bratton's house. There, Mrs. Bratton was ordered to prepare a meal for the intruders, and when Huck demanded she tell him where her husband was, she professed ignorance. One of the officers snatched a reaping hook from the wall and held it to her throat, threatening to cut off her head if she did not disclose the whereabouts of the Patriots. She steadfastly refused and another officer intervened on her behalf before her blood was shed. Capt. Edward Lacey's home was also in the area, but his worry was not of his wife or mother covering for him and thus invoking Huck's wrath, but rather of his father betraying him, as the old man was an avowed Loyalist. Lacey had to tie him to his bed to keep him from warning Huck of the Patriots' movements.

Secure in the delusion that he commanded the area, Huck had failed to post pickets at his camp, which lay between rail fences lining the road. They never heard the Patriots who snuck up on the sleeping British and opened fire at 75 paces. Huck mounted his horse to rally his troops but was shot in the neck and killed. Few others escaped death or capture. This American victory is significant because it was the first time a loose-knit band of Patriots had met and conquered an organized unit of British regulars. (Source: South Carolina's Revolutionary War Battlefields: A Tour Guide by R.L. Barbour (2002), pgs 41-42.)
    — Submitted January 10, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. MilitaryNotable BuildingsNotable PersonsNotable PlacesPatriots & PatriotismWar, US Revolutionary
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 14, 2009, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 884 times since then and 23 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 14, 2009, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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