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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Sussex in Sussex County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Public Parks: Refuge & Recreation for All

High Point State Park

 
 
Public Parks: Refuge & Recreation for All Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 25, 2009
1. Public Parks: Refuge & Recreation for All Marker
Inscription.
The First Public Park Was an Urban Oasis
When Europeans first arrived in America the land seemed limitless. However, by the late 1800s settlements stretched from the Atlantic to the Pacific. More people were living in crowded cities and needed an escape from city life. To create such an escape, Calvert Vaux and Frederick Law Olmsted designed Central Park in 1857. It was the first major public park.

People Followed the Roads and Rails to Parks
The Federal government began to set aside large tracts of land, primarily in the west, as forest preserves in 1891. This space was for recreation and the conservation of timber, wildlife and special landscapes. The railroads first brought sightseers to visit these remote preserves. Visiting parks became more common as cars replaced carriages and paved roads stretched out of the cities and into the countryside.

“It is a scientific fact that the occasional contemplation of natural scenes of an impressive character, particularly if this contemplation occurs in connection with relief from ordinary cares, changes of air and change of habits, is favorable to health and vigor of men . . . ”
Frederick Law Olmsted
The Value and Care of Parks (1865)


Look at the Land Stretching Out Below

From this mountaintop
Marker at High Point State Park image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 25, 2009
2. Marker at High Point State Park
The High Point Monument can be seen in the photo beyond the marker.
you can see more than 100,000 acres of protected public lands. These lands preserve unique habitats, historic landscapes and open space in the Delaware River Valley. In one of the most densely populated regions in the United States, this land is a crucial reserve for all that live here.

Parks Were Designed With You in Mind
Early parks were carefully planned landscapes. Buildings were rustic and simple. Scenic roads, trails, picnic areas, overlooks and other features were created to enhance the visitors’ experience. At High Point, many of these early improvements were made by the High Point Park Commission and the Civilian Conservation Corps, and are still in use today. The original park plan was designed by the Olmsted Brothers, renowned landscape architects.

U.S. Parks: The First Century
1857
  Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux design New York’s Central Park.
1860   Population of the U.S. reaches 32 million. Twenty percent live in urban areas.
1864   Yosemite Valley, CA is reserved as a state park.
1872   Yellowstone, the first National Park, is established.
1885   Niagara Reservation State Park, NY is established.
1895   Essex County, NJ establishes the first County Park system in the Nation.
1900   Population of the U.S. reaches 76 million. Forty percent live in urban areas.
1905
High Point Markers image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 25, 2009
3. High Point Markers
The "Public Parks: Refuge & Recreation for All" marker is seen here in the left foreground.
  NJ Governor, Edward Stokes, establishes Stokes Forest Reserves.
1907   Stokes State Forest is established.
1908   President Theodore Roosevelt calls attention to the importance of the country’s natural resources.
1914   The U.S. production of automobiles exceeds that of carriages and wagons.
1923   High Point State Park is established.
1933   The CCC is established as part of FDR’s “New Deal” program.
1940   More than half of all people in the U.S. live in urban areas, and more than half of all U.S. families own a car.
 
Erected by State of New Jersey.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Civilian Conservation Corps marker series.
 
Location. 41° 19.07′ N, 74° 40.133′ W. Marker is in Sussex, New Jersey, in Sussex County. Marker is on New Jersey Route 23, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located off the loop road in High Point State Park. Marker is in this post office area: Sussex NJ 07461, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. High Point: An Early Haven for Sightseers & Sportsmen (here, next to this marker); The Gift of a State Park (here, next to this
Markers at High Point image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 25, 2009
4. Markers at High Point
Four markers are found at this location in a picnic area in High Point State Park.
marker); The Kuser Lodge: An Inn, A Mansion, A Museum (here, next to this marker); High Point Monument (approx. 0.4 miles away); Indian Raid (approx. 3 miles away in New York); Trolley Line (approx. 3.1 miles away in New York); Machackemech Burying Ground (approx. 3.3 miles away in New York); a different marker also named Indian Raid (approx. 3.3 miles away in New York). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sussex.
 
More about this marker. A photograph entitled “On the bathing beach at Lake Marcia. High Point in the distance” appears on the marker. It has a caption of “Lake Marcia was a popular place to swim and picnic long before construction began on the monument in 1928.”
 
Also see . . .  High Point State Park. Outdoorplaces.com website. (Submitted on November 15, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Natural FeaturesNatural Resources
 
High Point Monument image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 25, 2009
5. High Point Monument
The High Point Monument can be seen here above Lake Marcia.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 15, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 644 times since then and 22 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on November 15, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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