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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New Orleans in Orleans Parish, Louisiana — The American South (West South Central)
 

The Washington Artillery Park

 

—American Revolution Bicentennial: 1776-1976 —

 
Washington Artillery Park Marker - Panel 1 image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 13, 2009
1. Washington Artillery Park Marker - Panel 1
Inscription. [Panel 1]:
On and near this site since 1718 has centered the military activities of both regular and citizen soldiers of France, Spain, the Confederacy and the United States. On either side were the redoubts forming the “Great Battery” which crisscrossed its fires with those of Fort San Carlos (Ft. St. Charles) at the foot of Esplanade Ave. and of Fort San Luis (Ft. St. Louis) at the river end of Canal Street. One block down river is the lot used as an artillery park for Spanish, French and American cannons. From here and from Place Darmer across the street the cannoniers, bombardiers of France, the Royal Artillery of Spain, the Battalion d’Artillerie d’Orleans, and for the last 100 years, the Washington Artillery (141st Field Artillery) have fired the salutes welcoming distinguished visitors to the Crescent City. To them and to their worthy successors this park is dedicated.
[The tiger logo of the "Battalion Washington Artillery" is at the top of the marker.]

[Panel 2]:
The Washington Artillery
(141st Field Artillery)
Organized May 1838
Service with General Zachary Taylor, Texas August-November 1846
Service with General Taylor in Texas-Mexico 1848
Service Confederate Army May 1861 to May 1866
Spanish-American War
Mexican Border June 1910
Washington Artillery Park Marker - Panel 2 image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 13, 2009
2. Washington Artillery Park Marker - Panel 2
to Feb. 1917
WWI April 1917 to May 1919
WWII Jan. 1941 to Dec. 1945
Emergency and Disaster Service Many Times.

CIVIL WAR
First Manassas
Peninsula
Second Manassas
Shiloh
Sharpsburg
Fredericksburg
Chancellorsville
Gettysburg
Chickamauga
Petersburg
Wilderness
Spotsylvania
Murfreesborough
Appomattox


WORLD WAR II
Algeria - French Morocco
Anzio
Ardennes - Alsace
Central Europe
Naples - Foggia
Normandy
North Appennines
Northern France
Po Valley
Rhineland
Rome-Arno
Sicily
Southern France
Tunisia

“TRY US”
[The tiger logo of the "Battalion Washington Artillery" is at the top of the marker.]
 
Erected 1976 by Battalion Washington Artillery.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the The Spirit of 76, America's Bicentennial Celebration marker series.
 
Location. 29° 57.419′ N, 90° 3.733′ W. Marker is in New Orleans, Louisiana, in Orleans Parish. Marker is on Decatur Street east of St. Peter Street, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is in the French Quarter (Vieux Carré) between St. Peter and St. Ann Streets,
The Washington Artillery Park - amphitheater seating southeast side image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 13, 2009
3. The Washington Artillery Park - amphitheater seating southeast side
with markers visible on wall above: Panel 1, far left; Panel 2, far right.
southeast of Jackson Square and northwest of the "Moonwalk" promenade and the Mississippi Riverfront. Marker is at or near this postal address: 700 Decatur Street, New Orleans LA 70116, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Woldenberg Riverfront Park (within shouting distance of this marker); The Steamer New Orleans (within shouting distance of this marker); New Orleans (within shouting distance of this marker); Café Du Monde (within shouting distance of this marker); Jackson Square - Vieux Carré (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Literary Landmark (about 500 feet away); Evans Creole Candy Factory (about 500 feet away); Cathedral of St. Louis, King of France (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New Orleans.
 
Also see . . .
1. Washington Artillery of New Orleans. (Submitted on August 8, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
2. Street Magic Show I & II. Video of a street magic show at Artillery Park (Submitted on August 8, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.) 
 
Additional keywords. Rebels; Jordan Noble;
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, Mexican-AmericanWar, US CivilWar, World II
 
Close up of Washington Artillery Park's southeast wall image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 13, 2009
4. Close up of Washington Artillery Park's southeast wall
and the New Orleans City Parks' renovation/improvement project markers of 1976, 1992, and 1997.
The Washington Artillery Park Memorial Cannon (Model 1861 Parrott Rifle) image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 13, 2009
5. The Washington Artillery Park Memorial Cannon (Model 1861 Parrott Rifle)
with additional unit history panels around base.
Street magician, Keith {Balloonatic} entertains tourists at the Washington Artillery Park image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 15, 2009
6. Street magician, Keith {Balloonatic} entertains tourists at the Washington Artillery Park
"Balloonatic" a.k.a. "The Great Wilsoni."
Jordan B. Noble, the Washington Artillery's renowned black drummer image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 14, 2009
7. Jordan B. Noble, the Washington Artillery's renowned black drummer
Interior display panel in the nearby Louisiana State Museum. [Like other American military organizations, the Washington Artillery (141st Field Artillery) was racially segregated into the mid-20th century; however, numerous "all-White" Southern militia units employed free men of color (like Jordan Noble) as drummers and musicians during the various conflicts of the "antebellum" period.] The marker reads:
Jordan Noble
Jordan B. Noble was the black drummer famous for beating the long roll at the Battle of New Orleans. Born in 1800 in Georgia, Noble came to New Orleans in 1811 and joined the 7th Regiment of the U.S. army one year later. He participated in several engagements of the Louisiana campaign. At the Battle of New Orleans he opened with reveille and closed with taps.
Noble’s exploits at the Battle of New Orleans were only the beginning of his long career as a military drummer and, later, as a popular New Orleans musician. During the Seminole War in Florida in 1836 he served as a field drummer for the First Louisiana Brigade, and in the Mexican War of 1846-1848 he beat his drum for the Washington Artillery. At the outbreak of civil war Noble rallied New Orleans’ free men of color to form militia companies on behalf of the Confederacy. When Union forces occupied southern Louisiana, he helped organize the free black Native Guards under General Benjamin Butler and served as a captain in the 7th Louisiana Volunteers.
Noble also performed at parades and commemorative celebrations. When he died on June 20, 1890, Noble’s obituary noted that “many will remember the white-headed old man and his well-worn drum, so often seen during the [World’s Industrial and Cotton Centennial] exposition of 1884 and 1885.”
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 18, 2017. This page originally submitted on August 8, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 2,482 times since then and 109 times this year. Last updated on November 19, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on August 8, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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