Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Pleasanton in Alameda County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Alviso Adobe Community Park

5,000 Years of History in Seven Acres

 
 
Alviso Adobe Community Park Panel 1 image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, November 6, 2009
1. Alviso Adobe Community Park Panel 1
This panel is mounted to the left of the entrance gate.
Inscription.
[Panel 1:]
Pleasantonís past and the rich stories of the people that have come before can be discovered in the landscape and features of this park. Three periods of occupation trace regional settlement from prehistory to the present day.

Native American Occupation
From as early as 3240 B.C., the valley was part of a permanent settlement of Indians. In the late 1700s, Spanish missionaries established nearby Mission San Jose, claiming this land and using it for cattle grazing.

[Panel 2:]
Hispanic and Early American Period
Ranching continued here after Mexico declared independence from Spain in 1824 and the missions were closed. The property was gradually split into smaller parcels and sold, with tenant farming becoming its main use.

Dairy Operation
From 1919 until 1969, this was the home of the Meadowlark Dairy, the first and only certified dairy in Alameda County. At its peak, the property was filled with buildings, cattle and activity.
 
Erected 2008 by City of Pleasanton.
 
Location. 37° 39.603′ N, 121° 54.719′ W. Marker is in Pleasanton, California, in Alameda County. Marker can be reached from Old Foothill Road near
Alviso Adobe Community Park Panel 2 image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, November 6, 2009
2. Alviso Adobe Community Park Panel 2
This panel is mounted to the right of the entrance gate.
Foothill Road. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3465 Old Foothill Road, Pleasanton CA 94588, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Francisco Solano Alviso Adobe (within shouting distance of this marker); Alviso Adobe (within shouting distance of this marker); Meadowlark Dairy - The Dairy Silo (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Meadowlark Dairy – Dairy Managerís House (about 300 feet away); Meadowlark Dairy – Dairy Bunkhouse (about 300 feet away); Rancho El Valle de San Jose (approx. 1Ĺ miles away); The Pleasanton Hotel (approx. 2.1 miles away); Gold Creek (approx. 2.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Pleasanton.
 
Categories. Native AmericansNatural ResourcesNotable Places
 
Entrance to the Alviso Adobe Community Park image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, November 6, 2009
3. Entrance to the Alviso Adobe Community Park
Marker panels can be seen flanking the entrance gate.
Alviso Adobe image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle
4. Alviso Adobe
The main focus of the park is the Alviso Adobe and the Meadowlark Dairy. See "Nearby Markers" for additional information on these sites.
The Meadowlark Dairy Hay Barn - Interpretive Center image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle
5. The Meadowlark Dairy Hay Barn - Interpretive Center
Site Map Display image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, November 6, 2009
6. Site Map Display
This plaque located between the Interpretive Center and the Adobe, shows the placement of the buildings during the peak of dairy operations.
A Bountiful Place image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, November 6, 2009
7. A Bountiful Place
Located throughout the park are interpretive markers detailing the natural resources and the changes the site has experienced over many years. This is an example of one of these markers:

Water and abundant food sources sustained the Ohlone population in the Pleasanton Valley.

For the Ohlone, fresh water was an important resouce for living. The seasonal drainage provides habitat for native plant species, many that were used by the Indians for food and medicinal purposes.

The rock features below, known as a bedrock mortar, was traditionally used by the Ohlone for processing acorns for eating. This is the only known remaining pre-historic feature in the park and is listed on the California Historic Register. The feature dates from perhaps as long as 3,000 BC and is most likely associated with one or more nearby archeological sites from the same time period.
Bedrock Mortars image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, November 6, 2009
8. Bedrock Mortars
These bedrock mortars are described on the marker seen in Photo #7
Valley Oak - <i>Quercus lobata</i> image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, November 6, 2009
9. Valley Oak - Quercus lobata
An example of stones placed at the base of several species of trees and plants throughout the park.

The acorns of this deciduous tree were a food staple for Native Americans. The Ohlone would harvest the acorns, grind them into flour, rinse the meal to leach the bitterness and bake into bread. The outer parts of the dough were used to make soup. Juice from the galls on the Valley oak was diluted and used for eyewash. It was also made into a black dye.
Valley Oak image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, November 6, 2009
10. Valley Oak
Dedication Plaque Mounted on the South Support Arch of the Adobe image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, November 6, 2009
11. Dedication Plaque Mounted on the South Support Arch of the Adobe

Alviso Adobe
Community Park

Dedicated October 25, 2008
City Council
Jennifer Hosterman, Mayor ∙ Jerry Thorne, Vice Mayor ∙ Cheryl Cook, Kallio ∙ Cindy McGovern ∙ Matt Sullivan

Parks and Recreation Commission
Kurt Kummer, Chairperson ∙ James Dibiase, Vice Chairperson ∙ Karen Ellgas ∙ Teddy Kinzer ∙ Jerry Pentin ∙ Herb Ritter

City Staff
Nelson Fialho, City Manager ∙ James W. Wolfe, Director of Parks and Community Services
City of Pleasanton
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 19, 2009, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California. This page has been viewed 1,631 times since then and 54 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 20, 2009, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.   4. submitted on November 16, 2009, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.   5. submitted on November 18, 2009, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.   6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. submitted on November 20, 2009, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.
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