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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Napa in Napa County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Embarcadero de Napa

 
 
Embarcadero de Napa Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, February 21, 2009
1. Embarcadero de Napa Marker
Inscription. Near this site was located the Embarcadero de Napa. While the exact date of establishment is unknown, it is recorded that Captain John Sutter sent his schooner Sacramento here in 1844 to get lime from Nicholas Higuerra, the first nonnative citizen of Napa City. Aboard the schooner were Joseph B. Chiles and other members of his party who had left Westport, Missouri in 1843 to come to the Napa Valley. This served as the terminal for passengers and freight well into the 20th Century.

Dedicated September 21, 2002
Sam Brannan Chapter E Clampus Vitus #104
 
Erected 2002 by Sam Brannan Chapter #104 of E Clampus Vitus.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the E Clampus Vitus marker series.
 
Location. 38° 17.715′ N, 122° 16.976′ W. Marker is in Napa, California, in Napa County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Brown Street and Division Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Napa CA 94559, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Napa: A River Landing Town (within shouting distance of this marker); Banner Warehouse 1862 (within shouting distance of this marker); Hatt Building 1893
Embarcadero de Napa Marker image. Click for full size.
By Loren Wilson
2. Embarcadero de Napa Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); Hay Barn 1959 (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); A. Hatt Buildings 1884 & 1886 (about 300 feet away); Silo Building 1932 (about 300 feet away); Hatt Building 1886 (about 400 feet away); Ars Longa Vita Brevis (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Napa.
 
More about this marker. The marker, although not difficult to find, is not readily visible. It can be found mounted on a rock set amongst some shrubs, where Division Street dead-ends at the banks of the Napa River, just south of the Embarcadero Building (part of the Napa River Inn complex).
 
Also see . . .  The History of Napa. The City of Napa's history of the City of Napa, provided by the Napa County Historical Society. (Submitted on December 23, 2009.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Additional Information Regarding the Marker Dedication
Wayne Brooks was the Noble Grand Humbug when this plaque was erected. Plaque wording by loren A. Wilson.
 
Embarcadero de Napa Marker - Wide View image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, February 21, 2009
3. Embarcadero de Napa Marker - Wide View
Here the marker is barely visible, nestled amongs the plants just to the right of the two small orange poles. The Napa River is visible in the background.
  — Submitted April 15, 2012, by Loren Wilson of Sebastopol, California.

 
Categories. Waterways & Vessels
 
View of Embarcadero de Napa Site image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, February 21, 2009
4. View of Embarcadero de Napa Site
This view, taken about 100 feet upriver from the marker site, looking south, shows the approximate location of the Embarcadero de Napa. At one point the Embarcadero was the hub for shipping goods and passengers in the Napa Valley, with a wharf and a number of warehouses. Today some of the warehouses can still be seen, converted into the Napa River Inn. All that remains of the wharf are some remnants of pilings still visible in the water.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 23, 2009, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 1,057 times since then and 38 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on December 23, 2009, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.   2. submitted on April 15, 2012, by Loren Wilson of Sebastopol, California.   3, 4. submitted on December 23, 2009, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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