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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Green Valley in Pima County, Arizona — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Titan II Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Museum

 
 
Titan II Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Museum Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, January 24, 2010
1. Titan II Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Museum Marker
Inscription.
Tucson Air Museum Foundation
of Pima County

Titan II Intercontinental
Ballistic Missile Museum

Established May 8, 1986

571st SMS, 390th SMW
Davis-Monthan AFB
Strategic Alert July 1963 – November 1982

National Historic Landmark
April 6, 1994

Dedicated
October 14, 1994

 
Erected 1994 by Tucson-Pima County Historical Commission.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Historic Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 31° 54.164′ N, 110° 59.939′ W. Marker is near Green Valley, Arizona, in Pima County. Marker can be reached from West Duval Mine Road. Touch for map. Marker is at north end of parking lot at the Titan Missile Museum. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1580 West Duval Mine Road, Green Valley AZ 85614, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 3 other markers are within 15 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Mission San Xavier del Bac (approx. 14.1 miles away); The Grotto at San Xavier del Bac (approx. 14.1 miles away); Boy Scout Memorial (approx. 15 miles away).
 
Regarding Titan II Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Museum.
Titan II Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Museum Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, January 24, 2010
2. Titan II Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Museum Marker
This site was designated as a National Historic Landmark on April 19, 1994:
Statement of Significance:
This is the sole remaining Titan II Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) complex of the 54 that were "on alert" during the Cold War between 1963 and 1987; as such, it is the single remaining example of the liquid-fueled ICBM launch facilities utilized by the Strategic Air Command. The Titan II missile carried the largest single warhead used in the ICBM program and was capable of destroying targets that Atlas, Titan I, and Minuteman I and II missiles could not. Built in response to the the "missile gap" panic of the late 1950s and early 1960s, Titan II Missile Site 571-7 provides a unique window into the design, construction, and operation of a weapon system built to survive a first-strike nuclear attack and be able to launch its missile if so ordered. The site has retained or assembled all of the above and below ground command and control facilities as well as the missile silo itself, which contains a Titan II missile.
 
Also see . . .  Titan Missile Museum, also known as Air Force Facility Missile Site 8 or as Titan II ICBM Site 571-7. A Wikipedia article on the missle site. This article also shows several additional photos of the museum and museum displays. (Submitted on January 27, 2010, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.)
Titan II Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Museum Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, January 24, 2010
3. Titan II Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Museum Marker
Missile Silo is at center of photo in background.
 
 
Categories. Air & SpaceLandmarksMilitaryNotable PlacesWar, Cold
 
Titan II Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Museum image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, January 24, 2010
4. Titan II Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Museum
Museum entrance. Marker is on the boulder at far right of photo.
Titan II Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Museum image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, 1
5. Titan II Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Museum
View down silo at Titan II
Note the large rectangular hole in the ablative heat shield material. The hole has been added under the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT) Agreement to show this system cannot be launched without overheating and destroying itself upon re-entering the atmosphere.
Titan II Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Museum image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, January 24, 2010
6. Titan II Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Museum
Warhead atop Titan II in silo
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 27, 2010, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. This page has been viewed 2,419 times since then and 74 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on January 27, 2010, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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