Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Charleston in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The Douxsaint House

 
 
The Douxsaint House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, February 13, 2010
1. The Douxsaint House Marker
Inscription.
This property, a part of one of the
original town lots in the Grand Model
of Charles Towne was bought by
Paul Douxsaint, merchant, planter, and
French Huguenot immigrant, in 1725.

The Charleston single house of French
type construction appears to have been
built in the mid 1700ís and is one of
two houses in this block that escaped
the Great Fire of 1775.

The present interior details reflect both
late Georgian and early Federal periods.

 
Erected by Preservation Society of Charleston.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the South Carolina, Preservation Society of Charleston marker series.
 
Location. 32° 46.668′ N, 79° 55.758′ W. Marker is in Charleston, South Carolina, in Charleston County. Marker is at the intersection of Church Street and Chalmers Street, on the right when traveling north on Church Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 132 Church Street, Charleston SC 29401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Huguenot Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Johnson's Row (within shouting distance of this marker); Bible Depository
The Douxsaint House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 20, 2011
2. The Douxsaint House Marker
(about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Footlight Players Workshop (about 300 feet away); The Grand Lodge of Ancient Freemasons of South Carolina (about 300 feet away); 54 Queen Street (about 300 feet away); William A. Giles (about 300 feet away); The Society of the Cincinnati of the State of South Carolina (about 300 feet away); St. Philip's Church (about 400 feet away); Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemasonry / Solomon's Lodge No. 1 (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Charleston.
 
Also see . . .
1. How the City Grew. The "Grand Modell of Charles Town" included the lower peninsula city of Charleston up to present-day Beaufain Street. (Submitted on October 6, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Charleston Single House. The Charleston Single House is the architectural style most associated with Charleston, South Carolina. (Submitted on October 6, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
The Douxsaint House image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, February 13, 2010
3. The Douxsaint House
1. Douxsaint-Macaulay House, 132 Church Street
Although this swelling has a plaque denoting its construction by the French Huguenot Paul Douxsaint in about 1726, that structure apparently burned in the fire of 1796. The exterior of the building, with its beaded weatherboarding, nine-over-nine windows with narrow muntins, and dormered hipped roof, follows the molding patterns of the early-Federal period. Most of the interior retains late-eighteenth-century wainscoting and mantels, although several rooms have have late-nineteenth-century alterations. The property retains an original, separated kitchen-laundry dependency at the rear, and brickwork on this structure with dogtooth cornicing relates to the post-Revolutionary period as well. In the nineteenth century Daniel Macaulay, a member of one of Charleston's leading Scottish merchant families, owned and occupied the dwelling. (Source: The Buildings of Charleston: A Guide to the City's Architecture by Jonathan H. Poston (1997) pg 84.)
    — Submitted October 6, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Colonial Era
 
The Douxsaint House image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, February 13, 2010
4. The Douxsaint House
The Douxsaint House image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 20, 2011
5. The Douxsaint House
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 15, 2010, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 694 times since then and 27 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on February 15, 2010, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina.   2. submitted on October 6, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3, 4. submitted on February 15, 2010, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina.   5. submitted on October 6, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement