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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Jarrell in Williamson County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Corn Hill Community

 
 
Corn Hill Community Marker image. Click for full size.
By Keith Peterson, March 20, 2010
1. Corn Hill Community Marker
Inscription. Settled primarily by settlers from Texas and the southern states, Corn Hill was one of the earliest communities in Williamson County. John E. King, county judge from 1858 to 1860, named it for the home he built on a hill and nearby cornfield in 1852. The dispersed agricultural community was the first stop on the stage line running from Georgetown to Fort Gates (Coryell County).

A post office opened in 1855 and by the 1860s, an influx of new residents settled here. In 1878, George G. Grant established Corn Hill Academy male and Female School, built on land donated by Judge King. It thrived and in 1886 moved to a new two-story building with four classrooms, a bell tower and an auditorium, which provided meeting space for local church services. By 1893, a public school opened as part of Corn Hill Independent School District.

By the end of the 19th century, Corn Hill had a saddle club, several churches, two local cotton gins, Corn Hill College, fraternal lodges and school organizations. By the early 1900s, community residents became active in Populist politics and in the Farmers’ Union. Industrial activity in the early 1900s included the Corn Hill and Gravis Telephone Company and a waterworks; a planned interurban to Bartlett never materialized.

The settlement began to decline in 1909 when the Bartlett Western
Corn Hill Community Marker image. Click for full size.
By Keith Peterson, March 20, 2010
2. Corn Hill Community Marker
This home, which sat behind the marker, has recently burned down.
Railway bypassed two miles to the north, establishing the town of Jarrell. Steam engines helped move homes and businesses to the new townsite, and other moved to the village of New Corn Hill, but many residents chose to remain here. Today, the dispersed Corn Hill settlement survives as a reminder of the area’s early agrarian heritage.
 
Erected 2007 by the Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 14014.)
 
Location. 30° 48.326′ N, 97° 36.887′ W. Marker is in Jarrell, Texas, in Williamson County. Marker is on I-35 Frontage Rd 0.1 miles south of County Route 312, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Jarrell TX 76537, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Cornhill Cemetery (approx. 0.7 miles away); Daniel Harrison (approx. 0.7 miles away); Jarrell (approx. 1˝ miles away); Community of Theon (approx. 3.2 miles away); Zion Lutheran Church (approx. 4.4 miles away); James B. Williams (approx. 6.8 miles away); Stockton Family Cemetery (approx. 8.2 miles away); John Berry, Frontiersman (approx. 8.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Jarrell.
 
Categories. Settlements & Settlers
 
Corn Hill Community Marker image. Click for full size.
By Keith Peterson, March 20, 2010
3. Corn Hill Community Marker
View of marker looking south toward old farm.
Corn Hill Community image. Click for full size.
By Keith Peterson, March 20, 2010
4. Corn Hill Community
Old home near marker.
Corn Hill Community image. Click for full size.
By Keith Peterson, March 20, 2010
5. Corn Hill Community
Old farm house near marker.
USGS 1893 map (surveyed 1885) showing Corn Hill, Texas image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney
6. USGS 1893 map (surveyed 1885) showing Corn Hill, Texas
See USGS US Topo and Historical Topographic Map Collection, Georgetown, Texas, 1893 (surveyed 1885). High resolution JPEG, click to read.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 19, 2010, by Keith Peterson of Cedar Park, Texas. This page has been viewed 613 times since then and 44 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on March 19, 2010, by Keith Peterson of Cedar Park, Texas.   6. submitted on February 2, 2015, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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