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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Richmond, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

John Marshall House

Built 1790

 
 
John Marshall House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, March 30, 2010
1. John Marshall House Marker
Inscription. The third United States Supreme Court Justice lived here until his death in 1835. His family remained until 1909, and the Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities (APVA) opened it to the public in 1913.
 
Erected by APVA-Preservation Virginia.
 
Location. 37° 32.511′ N, 77° 25.992′ W. Marker is in Richmond, Virginia. Marker is at the intersection of East Marshall Street and North 9th Street on East Marshall Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 818 East Marshall Street, Richmond VA 23219, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named The John Marshall House (here, next to this marker); The Edward V. Valentine Sculpture Studio (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Valentine Museum (about 600 feet away); Grant House / Sheltering Arms Hospital (about 700 feet away); Wickham-Valentine House (about 800 feet away); Freedmen's Bureau Freedman's Bank (about 800 feet away); Maupin - Maury House (about 800 feet away); Matthew Fontaine Maury (about 800 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Richmond.
 
More about this marker. An identical marker is in the
John Marshall House image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, March 30, 2010
2. John Marshall House
rear of the house.
 
Also see . . .
1. The John Marshall House. (Submitted on March 31, 2010, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.)
2. John Marshall. Library of Virginia (Submitted on March 31, 2010, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. GovernmentNotable BuildingsNotable Persons
 
John Marshall House (west side) image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, March 30, 2010
3. John Marshall House (west side)
John Marshall House (west side) image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, March 30, 2010
4. John Marshall House (west side)
John Marshall purchased the equivalent of the entire city block in 1788. He eventually added five outbuildings to service the House. In front of you, on the present site of the John Marshall Courts building, sat Marshall's law office, a two story brick structure.
John Marshall House Garden image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, March 30, 2010
5. John Marshall House Garden
The garden is fashioned in the late 18th century style and contains herbs and flowers from the period. The two story wooden kitchen building stood to the right with a small wooden smokehouse between it and the rear of the House. A two story wooden laundry building sat to the left, and a stable area occupied what is now the corner of 8th and clay Streets.
John Marshall House Garden image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, March 30, 2010
6. John Marshall House Garden
John Marshall House (rear) image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, March 30, 2010
7. John Marshall House (rear)
John Marshall House Marker (duplicate) image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, March 30, 2010
8. John Marshall House Marker (duplicate)
Adjacent site of John Marshall High School image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, March 30, 2010
9. Adjacent site of John Marshall High School
Home of Chief Justice Marshall (9th and Marshall Street), Richmond, Va. image. Click for full size.
By Louis Kaufmann & Sons, Baltimore, MD., circa 109
10. Home of Chief Justice Marshall (9th and Marshall Street), Richmond, Va.
One of the most interesting landmarks in the City is the old Marshall home, built by the great Chief Justice and occupied by him from 1795 until his death in 1835. Tho' [sic] the spacious grounds which once surrounded this old Colonial residence have been greatly reduced in area, the building itself retains its original appearance. In 1913 it was acquired by the Assn. For Preservation of Va. Antiquities as the permanent home of this organization. No more venerable and historical relic, of such general interest to all Americans is to be found in the South. Occupying a part of the same square is Richmond's splendid new high school. VCU Libraries Digital Collections - Rarely Seen Richmond
John Marshall image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 18, 2014
11. John Marshall
This 1809–10 portrait of John Marshall by Cephus Thompson hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington DC.

“John Marshall, the fourth chief justice of the United States, established the concept of judicial review — in which the Supreme Court could pronounce a law of Congress as unconstitutional — and strengthened the idea of an independent federal judiciary. In cases brought to the Court between 1810 and 1824 — years in which the Marshall Court enjoyed great stability and harmony — Marshall used the Court's judicial review to nullify state laws violating constitutional restraints of state power. The effect of Marshall's long tenure as chief justice (1801-35) was to strengthen the Court, the Constitution, and the federal government. The Court became a preeminent interpreter of the Constitution, and the federal government's enumerated powers were given a broad interpretation and made superior to those of the states.

Cephas Thompson painted a portrait of Marshall from life in Richmond, as well as six replicas for admirers, two years after Marshall presided at the trial of Aaron Burr for treason.” — National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 31, 2010, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 722 times since then and 20 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on March 31, 2010, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.   10. submitted on May 10, 2012, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.   11. submitted on July 15, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.
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