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Pontiac in Livingston County, Illinois — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Citizenry Mourn Lincoln

 

óLooking for Lincoln ó

 
Left Section - - Citizenry Mourn Lincoln Marker image. Click for full size.
By Al Wolf, April 10, 2010
1. Left Section - - Citizenry Mourn Lincoln Marker
(Click on any of these photos to see the details.)
Inscription. Left Section
When word of President Lincolnís assassination came, most of Pontiacís male population had not yet returned from the Civil War. But their wives and children remained, and when word was received that the special train bearing his body would pass through Pontiac the afternoon of May 2, 1865, business was suspended, schools were dismissed, and the entire population of the village and surrounding country made its way to the Chicago and Alton depot to pay their last respects. The news of Lincolnís death had been received in Pontiac with feelings of abject horror, and as the people waited and mourned the loss of the man who had walked their streets and mingled among them, they recalled with affection his wit and wisdom, his ideas and his ideals. Although the train did not leave Chicago until 9 P. M., a large crowd remained to see the train when it arrived in Pontiac at midnight. The ĎUnited Statesí, Lincolnís private coach, with tufted upholstery, fine woodwork and etched windows, was the most opulent car on the railroads in 1865. Strangely, Lincoln never used the car in life; it only served him as a funeral coach.

Middle Section
Livingston County had loyally supported Lincoln before he called for troops, sending its best and bravest. Many of its eligible male citizens, like
Middle Section - - Citizenry Mourn Lincoln Marker image. Click for full size.
By Al Wolf, April 10, 2010
2. Middle Section - - Citizenry Mourn Lincoln Marker
Lt. N. J. Murphy (pictured left), went to the front to support him in his successful effort to save the union and to banish slavery. Thus it was the women, the very young, and the very elderly who gathered in sorrow at the depot to pay final respects to their beloved martyred president.

Right Section
The train carrying Lincolnís remains left the nationís Capitol on April 21, taking a circuitous route through fifteen states and some 180 communities Lincoln had visited. With the exception of the car carrying the presidentís body, the other cars changed frequently as the train moved from one railroad line to another. The assassination took place on Good Friday, April 14. Lincolnís body then lay in state for seven days in the Capitol. The train reached Chicago on May 1, and Lincolnís coffin was lifted off the train to lie in state at the Cook County Courthouse. The following evening, the train, now led by C & A engine, pulled out of downtown Chicago. A pilot engine running five to ten minutes ahead of the funeral train observed torches and bonfires at crossroads as people gathered to express their respect and sorrow.
 
Erected 2009 by The City of Pontiac.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Looking for Lincoln marker series.
 
Location.
Right Section - - Citizenry Mourn Lincoln Marker image. Click for full size.
By Al Wolf, April 10, 2010
3. Right Section - - Citizenry Mourn Lincoln Marker
40° 52.782′ N, 88° 38.156′ W. Marker is in Pontiac, Illinois, in Livingston County. Marker is on North Vermillion Street south of West Madison Street, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Pontiac IL 61764, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Fell Leads The Way (here, next to this marker); Lincoln Stranded Here (approx. 0.2 miles away); Lincoln Visits Strevell (approx. ľ mile away); Lincoln Slept Here (approx. 0.3 miles away); W. W. I War Memorial - Livingston County Illinois (approx. 0.3 miles away); W. W. II War Memorial - Livingston County Illinois (approx. 0.3 miles away); Livingston County War Memorial (approx. 0.3 miles away); Desert Storm - War Memorial (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Pontiac.
 
Also see . . .
1. Visit Pontiac::. This web link has a number of links to other historic items in Pontiac, Illinois. Informative and very helpful. (Submitted on April 12, 2010, by Al Wolf of Veedersburg, Indiana.) 

2. Travel with Lincoln ::. Climb into Lincolnís buggy and take a trip with Lincoln and his fellow lawyers on the job traveling Illinois as Circuit Lawyers. See all the Lincoln Circuit Markers (and a surprise or two), in the order of his travels while a member
Middle Section - - Photo " Lt. N. J. Murphy " image. Click for full size.
By Al Wolf, April 10, 2010
4. Middle Section - - Photo " Lt. N. J. Murphy "
of the Circuit of the Eighth Judicial District (of Illinois) during 1847-1857. Use the “First >>” button in the upper right to see these markers in sequence, starting from Springfield. (Submitted on April 12, 2010, by Al Wolf of Veedersburg, Indiana.) 

3. Looking for Lincoln Video - on P. B. S. Follow Henry Louis Gates, Jr. "...from Illinois, to Gettysburg, to Washington, D. C., and face to face with people who live with Lincoln every day..." (Submitted on April 12, 2010, by Al Wolf of Veedersburg, Indiana.) 

4. Looking for Lincoln::. Many resources for the Tracking of Lincoln through History and Illinois. Aimed at all ages. (Submitted on April 12, 2010, by Al Wolf of Veedersburg, Indiana.) 
 
Categories. Notable Events
 
Right Section - - Photo - Lincoln's Funeral Train Car " The United States " image. Click for full size.
By Al Wolf, April 10, 2010
5. Right Section - - Photo - Lincoln's Funeral Train Car " The United States "
Looking North - - Citizenry Mourn Lincoln Marker image. Click for full size.
By Al Wolf, April 10, 2010
6. Looking North - - Citizenry Mourn Lincoln Marker
Looking South - - Citizenry Mourn Lincoln Marker image. Click for full size.
By Al Wolf, April 10, 2010
7. Looking South - - Citizenry Mourn Lincoln Marker
The marker can be seen in the back-ground.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 12, 2010, by Al Wolf of Veedersburg, Indiana. This page has been viewed 751 times since then and 23 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on April 12, 2010, by Al Wolf of Veedersburg, Indiana. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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