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Kinston in Lenoir County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Battle of Kinston

Federals Turn the Confederate Flank

 

—Foster's Raid —

 
Battle of Kinston Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 2, 2010
1. Battle of Kinston Marker
Inscription. (Preface): Late in 1862, Union Gen. John G. Foster's garrison was well entrenched in New Bern and made several incursions into the countryside. On December 11, Foster led a raid from New Bern to burn the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad Bridge over the Neuse River at Goldsboro and to demonstrate in support of Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside's attack at Fredericksburg, Virginia. Foster's force consisted of 10,000 infantry, 650 cavalry, and 40 cannons.

As Foster approached Kinston on December 13, he encountered Confederate defensive forces under Gen. Nathan G. Evans six miles southwest of here at Woodington on the Wilmington Road (present-day U.S. Route 258). After a fierce fight, Evans withdrew to earthworks here near the Neuse River and prepared for Foster's second attack, which came about 9 a.m. on December 14.

Evans stationed about 2,000 troops from the Carolinas here in a semicircular position extending from the river on your left about a mile to a swamp across Wilmington Road to your right. You are standing where the South Carolinians stood. Foster positioned his men for the attack in front of you. Gen. Henry W. Wessells, commanding one of Foster's brigades, divided his unit to attack Evans' left flank here. The Federals encountered thick woods, brambles, and a determined resistance. Eventually, however, with superior
Map of the Battle image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 2, 2010
2. Map of the Battle
numbers and heavy artillery fire, they succeeded in breaking through the Confederate left flank. The South Carolinians gave way, crossing the Jones bridge (which stood just downstream from the modern one) into Kinston. Evans ordered the bridge set afire before the North Carolinians, on the right flank, had a chance to cross over, and many of them were captured as they fled in panic. After a brief stand on the north side of Kinston, Evans withdrew his troops. Foster and his men spent the night of December 14 in Kinston and departed for Goldsboro the next morning.
 
Erected by North Carolina Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the North Carolina Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 35° 14.387′ N, 77° 34.872′ W. Marker is in Kinston, North Carolina, in Lenoir County. Marker is at the intersection of Meadowbrook Drive and Harriette Drive, on the right when traveling north on Meadowbrook Drive. Touch for map. Located at the First Battle of Kinston Civil War site and memorial. The site is stop 10 on the First Battle of Kinston driving tour. Marker is in this post office area: Kinston NC 28504, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. North Carolina (approx. 0.3 miles away); Starr's Battery
Foster's Raid Map image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 2, 2010
3. Foster's Raid Map
(approx. 0.3 miles away); Lenoir County Confederate Memorial (approx. 0.4 miles away); The Union Artillery (approx. 0.4 miles away); Foster's Raid (approx. 0.4 miles away); Wessells' Advance—December 14, 1862 (approx. 0.4 miles away); The Center of the Confederate Line (approx. 0.4 miles away); The Action in the Swamp (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Kinston.
 
More about this marker. On the lower left are portraits of Gens. Foster, Wessells, and Evans. On the right is a map showing the tactical situation in the middle phase of the battle. In the lower right is a map showing the Approximate route of Gen. John G. Foster's raid from New Bern to Goldsboro, December 1862.
 
Also see . . .  First Battle of Kinston. Page detailing the battle and efforts to preserve portions of the battlefield. (Submitted on May 9, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Battle of Kinston Civil War Site image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 2, 2010
4. Battle of Kinston Civil War Site
The marker stands to the left of the walkway and wall.
Battle Line image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 2, 2010
5. Battle Line
Much of the original battlefield is now covered by businesses and residences. At this site, a berm replicates the battle lines. Small metal markers with state abbreviations list the regiments involved on both sides of the fighting.
Dedication Plaque at the Site image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 2, 2010
6. Dedication Plaque at the Site
This site is dedicated to honor the brave
soldiers, both Confederate and Union, who
fought and died for their beliefs, rights, and
freedom during the first battle of Kinston,
December 13 and 14, 1862
by
the Historical Preservation Group, Inc.,
and
the Lenoir County Battlefields Commission
December 11, 2004.
Wilbur Fred King, III Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 2, 2010
7. Wilbur Fred King, III Memorial
This site is dedicated
to the memory of
Wilbur Fred King, III
1966 - 2003
Wil king touched the lives of many people in his quest to preserve
Lenoir County's Civil War Battlefields
Wil's great love for history and his leadership were an inspiration
and a driving force in the preservation endeavors of this community.
Lenoir County Battlefields Commission - Resolution of Appriciation image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 2, 2010
8. Lenoir County Battlefields Commission - Resolution of Appriciation
The Commission expresses appreciation for those who supported preservation efforts.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 9, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,098 times since then and 51 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on May 9, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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