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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Charleston in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Gorge Wall

 
 
Gorge Wall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 3, 2010
1. Gorge Wall Marker
Inscription. Fort Sumter was designed with its strength toward the sea. The gorge, the lightly-armed rear wall facing inland, was vulnerable to attack from Morris Island. Early shelling left the gorge wall in ruins. Continued bombardment reduced the gorge to rubble, but Confederate soldiers and slaves reinforced the debris with sandbags and cotton bales, creating an earthwork that made the fort stronger than ever.
 
Erected by Fort Sumter National Monument, South Carolina - National Park Service - U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 32° 45.136′ N, 79° 52.501′ W. Marker is in Charleston, South Carolina, in Charleston County. Touch for map. Marker is located at Fort Sumter National Monument and only reached by boat. See links below for more information about access to the site. Marker is in this post office area: Charleston SC 29412, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Garrison Defending Fort Sumter (here, next to this marker); Battery Huger (a few steps from this marker); Powder Magazine (a few steps from this marker); Fort Sumter 1861-65 (a few steps from this marker); Fort Sumter Today
Gorge Wall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 4, 2013
2. Gorge Wall Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); Casemates and Cannon (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Johnson (within shouting distance of this marker); Charleston Besieged (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Charleston.
 
More about this marker. In the center is a wartime photograph showing damage to the wall. The arch in the center of this 1861 photograph is the original fort entry, or sally port, which was later relocated where you entered today. On the right is a cross section of the wall. The gorge wall originally contained offices, the guardhouse, storerooms, the powder magazine, and three-story apartments for officers and their families. At the bottom right is a floor plan of the officer's quarters.
 
Also see . . .  Directions to Fort Sumter. The only way to reach the fort is by boat. Most visitors use the Spirit Line Cruises, although private boats are allowed. (Submitted on May 19, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US Civil
 
Close up of Cross Section and Floor Plan image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 3, 2010
3. Close up of Cross Section and Floor Plan
Gorge Wall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 3, 2010
4. Gorge Wall Marker
Remains of the Gorge Wall image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 3, 2010
5. Remains of the Gorge Wall
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 19, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 752 times since then and 25 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on May 19, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on August 17, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3, 4, 5. submitted on May 19, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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