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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Sullivans Island in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

10-Inch Columbiad (Rodman)

 
 
10-Inch Columbiad (Rodman) Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 3, 2010
1. 10-Inch Columbiad (Rodman) Marker
The photo on the marker shows Rodman guns in place at Fort Pulaski.
Inscription. Advanced manufacturing and scientific design by General T.J. Rodman made this Columbiad the finest of large smoothbore armor crushers. 10 and 15 inch Rodmans were mounted in Fort Moultrie as part of a massive modernization program in the 1870's.

Maximum Range: 5600 yards (5120 M)
 
Location. 32° 45.534′ N, 79° 51.407′ W. Marker is in Sullivans Island, South Carolina, in Charleston County. Marker is on Poe Avenue, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Located in the cannon walk, stop eight, on the tour of Fort Moultrie. Marker is in this post office area: Sullivans Island SC 29482, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 10-Inch Confederate Columbiad (here, next to this marker); 10-Inch Columbiad, Rifled and Banded (a few steps from this marker); 13-Inch Seacoast Mortar (a few steps from this marker); 7-Inch Brooke Rifle, Triple Banded (a few steps from this marker); Civil War Armament (a few steps from this marker); 8-inch Parrott (200 Pounder) (a few steps from this marker); 10-Inch Parrott (300 pounder) (within shouting distance of this marker); Battle of Fort Sullivan (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sullivans Island.
 
Categories. MilitaryWar, US Civil
 
Rodman Breech image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 3, 2010
2. Rodman Breech
Rodman also introduced several new features to the breech of the gun. The "mushroom" cascabel is the groove around the rim of the breech. This allowed tackle to fit around the gun during handling, without stressing the traditional knob seen on other weapons of the time. The square holes in the breech face are sockets for a simple elevating system, replacing the ratchet system on older columbiads.
10-Inch Rodmans and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 3, 2010
3. 10-Inch Rodmans and Marker
Both Rodmans displayed here were cast by Fort Pitt Foundry, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. On the left is registry number 156. On the right is number 182. Both were cast in 1863.
10-Inch Rodman image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 3, 2010
4. 10-Inch Rodman
The Rodman gun featured gradual, sweeping lines, sometimes called a "continuous curve" in contemporary manuals. Rodman also used several revolutionary (for the time) casting processes. He required very precise blending of metal to meet a desired specific gravity before cooling. And after casting, cold water circulated through a tube in the bore, allowing the gun to cool from the inside out. This "pre-stressed" the gun and provided great strength to the weapon.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 21, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 704 times since then and 30 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on June 21, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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