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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Utica in Oneida County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

At This Point

 

40 mile route taken by Gen. Herkimer Aug. 3-6, 1777

 
At This Point Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 16, 2010
1. At This Point Marker
Inscription.  40 mile route taken by Gen. Herkimer Aug. 3-6, 1777 for the relief of Fort Stanwix. The Battle of Oriskany Aug. 6, between Herkimer's men and St. Leger with his Indians was the turning point of the Revolution.

At this point,
On August 5, 1777,
Gen. Herkimer
With the greater part of his men
And wagon train,
Turned southerly
To ford the Mohawk.


 
Erected 1912 by Col. Marinus Willet Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, of Frankfort. (Marker Number 7.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution, and the General Herkimer''s 40 Mile March marker series.
 
Location. 43° 6.882′ N, 75° 12.33′ W. Marker is in Utica, New York, in Oneida County. Marker is at the intersection of Herkimer Road and Leland Avenue, on the left when traveling east on Herkimer Road. This historical marker is located where on the north side of the Mohawk River, right where Leland Avenue crosses the Mohawk River and dead ends into Herkimer Street,
At This Point Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 16, 2010
2. At This Point Marker
Close-up view of the map on the top half of this historical marker.
on the north side of Herkimer Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 301 Herkimer Road, Utica NY 13502, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. First Baptist Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); First Baptist (approx. 0.2 miles away); Bagg's Tavern (approx. 1.2 miles away); Utica (approx. 1.2 miles away); The Great Ford of the Mohawk (approx. 1.2 miles away); The Site of Old Fort Schuyler (approx. 1.2 miles away); a different marker also named The Site of Old Fort Schuyler (approx. 1.2 miles away); General Herkimer Marched Past This Spot (approx. 1.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Utica.
 
Regarding At This Point. This historical marker is part of a series of historical markers that mark the 40 mile route taken by Gen. Herkimer Aug. 3-6, 1777 for the relief of Fort Stanwix, that resulted in the Battle of Oriskany. Some historians believe that this battle, fought between Herkimer's Patriots with his Oneida allies and St. Leger's Loyalists with their Indian allies, was the turning point of the Revolutionary War.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .  Oriskany Battlefield, Oriskany, NY -- A Site on a Revolutionary.
At This Point Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 16, 2010
3. At This Point Marker
40-mile route taken by General Herkimer, August 3-6, 1777 for the relief of Fort Stanwix. (Submitted on June 30, 2010, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 
 
Categories. Native AmericansPatriots & PatriotismSettlements & SettlersWar, US Revolutionary
 
At This Point Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 16, 2010
4. At This Point Marker
View of historical marker, looking east along Highway 5 (Herkimer Road) towards Fort Dayton, along route used by General Herkimer's Army, on their way to Fort Stanwix.
At This Point Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 16, 2010
5. At This Point Marker
View looking south, from behind the historical marker, of the spot where General Herkimer's Army turned south to cross the Mohawk River, along present day Leland Avenue.
 

More. Search the internet for At This Point.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 30, 2010, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 730 times since then and 18 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on June 30, 2010, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.
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