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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Bamberg in Bamberg County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Bamberg

 
 
Bamberg Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 3, 2010
1. Bamberg Marker
Inscription. Hooten- Black House & Bamberg's National Historic District
The Hooten- Black House is the hub of art and history in Bamberg County where you will find changing art exhibitions, concerts, and lectures on Bamburg County history. The Hooten- Black House house anchors the northwestern end of Bamberg's National Historic District. A self-guided walking tour brochure with a map describes the 75 properties found within the Historic District is available at the Hooten-Black House. Properties include the homes of General Francis Marion Bamberg, for whom the county is named, and South Carolina Supreme Court Justice Julius B. Ness.
(Pictures included)
(l) Built circa in 1880 by Drew Hooten, the Hooten-Black house now serves as the Welcome Center for Bamberg.
(c) Looking south, Bamberg's Main Street and Historic Downtown.
(r) The smokestack of the Old Cotton Mill built in 1829 is the only remnant still standing at the south end of Main Street.

S.C. Canal & Railroad Company
Built in the early 1830's, the South Carolina Canal and Railroad line passed through the area on its way to Hamburg. Local landowners donated the property needed for the railroad right of way. The village, which would later be called Bamberg, developed with the railroad and was chartered in 1855.
Bamberg Marker, Hooten- Black House & Bamberg's National Historic District image. Click for full size.
By South Carolina National Heritage Corridor
2. Bamberg Marker, Hooten- Black House & Bamberg's National Historic District
(National Register of Historic Places: Bamberg Historic District ** added 1983 - District - #83002184) E. Railroad Ave., 2nd, Midway, Elm, Cannon, N. Carlisle, and Church Sts., Bamberg Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering Architectural Style: Late Victorian, Other, Late 19th And 20th Century Revivals Area of Significance: Architecture Period of Significance: 1875-1899, 1900-1924, 1925-1949
The railroad line was the longest in the world at the time of its construction spanning 137 miles of roadbed and rail. It was the first railroad to offer scheduled passenger service and carry mail.(Picture included)In 1970 the Charleston to Hamburg railroad was designated as a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark by the American Society of Civil Engineers. Once home to the oldest railroad line, today it is a city owned walking trail.

Bamberg & the Civil War
Bamberg, then part of the Old Barnwell District, was the home to three signers of the Ordinance of Session from the Union and the President of the Secession Convention. David Flavel Jamison served as President of the Secession Convention and owned a local plantation. Jamison died before the conclusion of the War Between the States and prior to General William T. Sherman's Carolinas Campaign. However, due to his involvement with the secessionist movement, Gen. Sherman ordered the Jamison Plantation destroyed.
Major General William T. Sherman's Carolina Campaign was especially destructive in Bamberg. Sherman tore up the railroad ties that were so vital to the economy of the town and most of the antebellum structures were destroyed. Bamberg paid dearly for being the hometown of three signers' of the Ordinance of Session. The Simmons House is one of the few antebellum
Bamberg Marker, S.C. Canel & Railroad Company image. Click for full size.
By South Carolina National Heritage Corridor
3. Bamberg Marker, S.C. Canel & Railroad Company
structures that survived and can be seen today.
(Pictures included) David Flavel Jamison (1810-1864), President of the secession Convention
Major General William T. Sherman, USA
 
Erected by South Carolina National Heritage Corridor.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the South Carolina Heritage Corridor marker series.
 
Location. 33° 17.817′ N, 81° 1.992′ W. Marker is in Bamberg, South Carolina, in Bamberg County. Marker is on East Railroad Avenue near North Street, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Located just north along the abandoned Railroad Bed and US 78. Marker is in this post office area: Bamberg SC 29003, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 11 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Bamberg County Confederate Monument (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Carlisle Military School (approx. 0.2 miles away); Pinewood Plantation (approx. 3.6 miles away); Woodlands (approx. 4.5 miles away); Voorhees College (approx. 5.7 miles away); AT&T Building (approx. 6.5 miles away); Denmark Depot (approx. 6.7 miles away); Salem Methodist Church (approx. 10.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Bamberg.
 
Also see . . .
Bamberg Marker, Bamberg & the Civil War image. Click for full size.
By South Carolina National Heritage Corridor
4. Bamberg Marker, Bamberg & the Civil War
General David Flavel Jamison a founder of The Citadel

1. South Carolina Declaration of Secession. "Declaration of the Immediate Causes Which Induce and Justify the Secession of South Carolina from the Federal Union...." (Submitted on July 10, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

2. William Tecumseh Sherman , Wikipedia entry. Includes Final campaigns in the Carolinas (Submitted on July 10, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Notable PlacesRailroads & StreetcarsSettlements & SettlersWar, US Civil
 
Bamberg Marker, looking west along East Railroad Avenue image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 3, 2010
5. Bamberg Marker, looking west along East Railroad Avenue
Hooten-Black House, seen today image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 3, 2010
6. Hooten-Black House, seen today
Bamberg image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2011
7. Bamberg
The smokestack of the Old Cotton Mill built in 1829 is the only remnant still standing at the south end of Main Street, as mentioned
Bamberg County Courthouse image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2011
8. Bamberg County Courthouse
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 10, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,221 times since then and 59 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on July 10, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   7, 8. submitted on May 30, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.
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