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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Virginia Beach, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Virginia Legends Walk

 
 
Virginia Legends Walk Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
1. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
Inscription. Several markers are located along the Virginia Legends Walk. In order, starting from the eastern entrance, they read as follows:
Grace Sherwood
(1660-1730)

Sherwood lived in Princess Anne County from the latter 1600ís until the 1730ís, an era when many American colonists believed in witchcraft as a way to explain unusual events. Sherwood submitted to a trial by water, a “witch ducking,” in 1706, because of charges that her behavior disrupted the lives of her neighbors. Although found guilty of witchcraft, her life was spared, and she was pardoned formally by the governor of Virginia 300 years later in 2006. She was Virginiaís only convicted witch tried by water. Witchduck Road and Witchduck Point contribute to preserving her story.

Elected by the Fifth Grade Classes of the Virginia Beach City Public Schools in recognition of the 400th Anniversary of Virginia Beach.

George Washington
1732 – 1799
Westmoreland County

The Father of Our Country, Washington was unanimously elected the First President of the United States. He commanded the American forces at Yorktown to victory over the British, creating American Independence. He later individually stopped a soldierís rebellion on the young nationís Congress and preserved the
Virginia Legends Walk - Grace Sherwood Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
2. Virginia Legends Walk - Grace Sherwood Marker
countryís hard-won freedom.

Douglas MacArthur
1880 – 1964
Norfolk

Gen. MacArthur was one of only five American five-star generals. His leadership in the Pacific helped to ensure allied victory, and he accepted Japan's unconditional surrender ending World War II. He is remembered for saying "I shall return!" to the Philippine people, and "Old soldiers never die - they just fade away."

Booker T. Washington
1856 - 1915
Franklin County

Born a slave and deprived of any early education, Booker T. Washington became America's foremost black educator of the 20th Century. He was the founder of Tuskegee Institute where he championed vocational training as a means for black self-reliance. A well-known orator and writer, he was the advisor to Presidents Theodore Roosevelt and William Taft on race relations.

George S. Patton
1885-1945
Lexington/Ft. Myer

Gen. Patton, a second-generation VMI cadet with three Calvary tours at Ft. Myer, is among the greatest military commanders in U.S. history. He led allied ground troops in Africa, achieved victory in Sicily in just 38 days, and showed superb military skills in France and Germany, speeding the end of World War II.

James Madison
1751-1836
Orange County

The
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
3. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
4th U.S. President, Madison was the author of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, which earned him the reputation as "Father of the Constitution." Serving during the "Second Revolution," or the War of 1812, he empowered the Navy with three frigates: the "Constitution," the "United States" and the "President."

Cyrus Hall McCormick
1809-1884
Rockbridge

McCormick invented the mechanical reaper in 1834, combining all steps that earlier harvesting machines performed separately. His time-saving invention allowed farmers to double their crop size and spurred innovations in farm machinery. His factory eventually became one of the greatest industrial establishments in the U.S.

Thomas Jefferson
1743-1826
Albemarle County

Jefferson served two terms as third President of the U.S. He was the sole writer of the Declaration of Independence, founder of the University of Virginia, and the author of separation of church and state. He is among the most revered architects of all time.

Patsy Cline
1932-1963
Winchester

The Queen of Country Music, her multimillion-selling records are played worldwide. The first female solo artist in the Country Music Hall of Fame, Cline also is in the Recording Hall of Fame and the National Cowgirl Hall of Fame,
Virginia Legends Walk Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
4. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
and was a recipient of the highest industry honor: Grammy for Lifetime Achievement.

John Marshall
1755-1835
Fauquier County

Marshall is widely considered the founder of Constitutional Law and judicial precedent for his decisions during his 34-year tenure as the third Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. He also served as the U.S. Secretary of State, as a U.S. representative, and in the Virginia house of delegates.

Arthur Ashe
1943-1993
Richmond

Ashe was the first African-American tennis player to win Wimbledon, the U.S. Open and the Australian Open. He played on the U.S. Davis Cup team (1963-70, '75, '76, '78) and as captain, the U.S. won ('81, '82). Ashe was the 1992 Sportsman of the Year.

Meriwether Lewis
1774-1809
Albemarle County

Selected by President Jefferson, Lewis and William Clark led the western exploration of the land obtained by the Louisiana Purchase. The expedition was successful beyond all expectations in terms of geography, botany, biology, and first American contact with many Native American tribes.

Chief Powhatan
1547-1618
Gloucester County

Chief Powhatan was the paramount ruler of more than 30 indigenous tribes in the Chesapeake Bay area, and the highest
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
5. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
Native American authority the Virginia colonists encountered. He welcomed Capt. John Smith, and initiated peaceful relations with the English colonists. His legacy today includes several descendant communities among Virginia's recognized Indian tribes.

Ella Fitzgerald
1918-1996
Newport News

The First Lady of Jazz possessed superlative musicianship and skill in scat singing (improvisational vocals). After being discovered at age 16 in a Harlem talent show, Fitzgerald performed throughout America, Europe and Asia and on milestone recordings with Duke Ellington, Oscar Peterson and Louis Armstrong.

Patrick Henry
1736-1799
Hanover County

Henry was a living symbol of America's struggle for liberty and self-government from British rule. His immortal appeal was, "I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death." He was the first Virginia governor under its new constitution, serving three terms.

Walter Reed
1851-1902
Gloucester County

Reed received his medical degree from UVa at 18 and became a career Army Major. By 40 he was engaged in some of the most important work in the history of medicine. Reed's research into the cause and spread of typhoid and yellow fevers saved millions of lives. The
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
6. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
Walter Reed Army Medical Center in D.C. is named in his honor, and is the nation's foremost military health care provider and center for worldwide health referrals, education and research.

Pearl Bailey
1918-1990
Newport News

President Nixon dubbed her "Ambassador of Love" to the world. "Pearlie Mae" sang with Count Basie and Cab Calloway, starred in the movie version of "Porgy and Bess," won a Tony Award for an African-American version of "Hello Dolly," and received the Medal of Freedom from President Reagan.

George Mason
1725-1792
Fairfax County

Mason's wording in the Virginia Declaration of Rights in 1776 influenced the first ten amendments to the Constitution forming the U.S. Bill of Rights. His stand as an unwavering abolitionist led to halting the importation of slaves to America.

Richard E. Byrd
1888-1957
Winchester

Byrd, a Naval Academy graduate, pioneered early technology that became the foundation for modern polar exploration and investigation. He also pioneered the technique of nighttime landings of seaplanes on the ocean. On May 9th, 1926 Byrd reached the North Pole, feat that earned him the Medal of Honor. He then flew over the South Pole in November 1929. During World War II, Admiral Bryd was Chief of Naval Operations.

T.
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
7. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
J. "Stonewall" Jackson
1824-1863
Lexington

Thomas J. Jackson served on the VMI faculty as Professor of Natural and Experimental Philosophy and Instructor of Artillery. His bravery and battle skills led Confederate troops to victory in ten major battles. At Manassas, greatly outnumbered, it was noted, "Look, there stands Jackson like a stone wall."

Alan B. Shepard
1923-1998
Virginia Beach

The first American astronaut in space, Shepard flew aboard Mercury 3, reaching an altitude of 116 miles on a 15-minute flight on May 5, 1961. In 1971, he commanded Apollo 14 and walked on the surface of the moon for nine hours. On live worldwide TV, he became the first person to golf on the moon.

The Carter Family
A.P. Carter, 1891-1960
Sara Dougherty, 1898-1979
“Mother” Maybelle Carter, (1909-1978)
Clinch Mountain

“The First Family of Country Music,” They switched emphasis from hillbilly instrumentals to harmony vocals, made scores of standard country music classics, and made their “CarterLick” guitar-playing the dominant technique for decades. The first group inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1970, they also earned a Lifetime Achievement Grammy Award in 2005 and Grammy Hall of Fame songwriting recognition
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
8. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
in 1998.

Pocahontas
1596(?)-1617
Henrico County

Pocahontas, daughter of Algonquin Chief Powhatan, displayed her heroism in 1607 by saving Captain John Smith's life. She was the first Native American to convert to Christianity and receive an English name, "Rebecca." Her marriage to John Rolfe brought peace between the English and Powhatan tribes, an accomplishment affecting the rest of American history.

Robert E. Lee
1807-1870
Stratford

One of America's most brilliant military strategists, Lee graduated from the U.S. Military Academy 2nd in his class, as the only cadet who never earned a single demerit. He commanded the Confederate Army and surrendered at Appomattox to end the Civil War.

William Henry Harrison
1773-1841
Charles City County

Harrison attained nearly 50 million acres of land from treaties with Native American tribes. This resulted in a rebellion by Indian leader Tecumseh, and led to the Battle of Tippecanoe, which made Harrison a hero of the War of 1812. He served in the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate and as Ambassador to Columbia. As the ninth U.S. President, he was the first elected Whig Party candidate.

Bill "Bojangles" Robrinson
1878-1949
Richmond

"Bojangles"
Virginia Legends Walk Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
9. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
was the first African-American superstar entertainer, starting in Vaudeville as a dancer and becoming a movie actor. By 1908, he was earning $3,500 a week. His famous "stair dance" was invented spontaneously while we was receiving an honor from the King of England, who was atop steps.

Edgar Allan Poe
1809-1849
Richmond

"The Dark Genius," Poe is among America's best poets and the originator of the American short story, both of which he elevated to art forms. He penned such literary classics as "The Raven," "The Pit and the Pendulum," "The Tell-Tale Heart," and "The Murders in the Rue Morgue."

George C. Marshall
1880-1959
Lexington

Gen. Marshall graduated VMI, beginning a long career of public service including Secretary of Defense, Secretary of State, Army Chief of Staff and helping to develop NATO. His "Marshall Plan" for European economic reconstruction earned him the Nobel Peace Prize, as the first soldier to win that honor.

James Monroe
1758-1831
Westmoreland County

The 5th U.S. President, his Monroe Doctrine was the foundation of foreign affairs: America would never again accept colonization by European powers. America would deem any attempt at such colonization dangerous to our peace and safety. Wars in Europe would not necessarily
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
10. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
include America.

Tom Wolfe
1931 -
Richmond

Wolfe is the father of New Journalism being the first use present tense in magazine profiles. He coined the terms "statusphere," "radical chic," "The Me Decade," and "good ol' boy," as well as "The Right Stuff," which became a movie that won four Oscars and eight Academy Award nominations in 1983.

Woodrow Wilson
1865-1924
Staunton

The 28th U.S. President, Wilson was Commander of the largest armed force in U.S. history during World War I. Always for peaceful resolve, his Fourteen points led to the Armistice, effectively ending the war with the Versailles Treaty. He also served as President of Princeton University.

Captain John Smith
1580-1631
Jamestown

Our earliest national hero, Captain Smith established the first permanent English settlement in America in Jamestown in 1607. Saved by Pocahontas, he established peaceful relations with the Algonquin Indian tribes. His rigid discipline was "He who does not work, will not eat," and his strong leadership was the foundation of the settlement's survival.

William Styron
1925-2006
Newport News

Styron won the Pulitzer Prize for Literature as well as the William Dean Howells Medal from the American
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
11. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
Academy of Arts and Letters in 1968 as a result of “The Confessions of Nat Turner.” He also wrote Sophie's Choice and won the National Book Award in 1980, which was made into a movie in 1982 and received five Academy Award nominations and the Best Actress Oscar.

Zachary Taylor
1784-1850
Barboursville

The 12th U.S. President, Taylor earned his national reputation in the Mexican War. There he commanded the military in Texas after its annexation to the U.S. and successfully kept the territory in American possession. His nickname was "Old Rough and Ready."

John Tyler
1790-1862
Charles City County

The 10th U.S. President, Tyler was the first to succeed on death of an incumbent. He established "full presidential powers, not just acting power." His foreign policy opened trade with China and established the Maine boundary. He was the force driving the annexation of Texas, and he ended the Seminole War.

Katie Couric
1957 -
Arlington

Couric was the first woman to solo anchor and be managing editor for a major television news prime-time broadcast, the CBS Evening News, in 2006. Prior to that, Couric was co-host of “BC Today”for five years an co-host of the Barcelona Summer Olympics in 1992. Couric, a prominent advocate
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
12. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
for colon and breast cancer awareness, inspired hundreds of thousands of people to get regular checkups.

Virginia Legends Walk
Dedicated July 19, 1999
Project Team
City of Virginia Beach

Beach events by Cellar Door, Sprint PCS, Brickell &Partners, Langley and McDonald, Inc, McKenzie Construction, Dernis International, Middleton Construction Corps., Admiral Signs, Masonry Buildings Corp., Pricewaterhouse Coopers, Proudly Sponsored by Spint, Sprint PCS.
va-legends.com

2000
White House Millennium Council
“Honor the Past ~ Imagine the Future”

 
Erected 1999 by the City of Virginia Beach.
 
Location. 36° 50.496′ N, 75° 58.413′ W. Marker is in Virginia Beach, Virginia. Marker is on 13th Street. Touch for map. The Virginia Legends Walk, once 13th Street between Atlantic and Pacific Avenues, is now a pedestrian only walkway. Marker is in this post office area: Virginia Beach VA 23451, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. de Witt Cottage (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Neptune (approx. 1.3 miles away); Atlantic Parkway (approx.
Virginia Legends Walk Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
13. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
2.1 miles away); Eastern Shore Chapel (approx. 2.5 miles away); The Flame of Hope (approx. 2.5 miles away); Flame Of Hope (approx. 2.5 miles away); Peace Monument (approx. 3.6 miles away); Historic Cayce Hospital Building (approx. 3.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Virginia Beach.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Other Virginia Legends markers in the database. There is no Historical Marker in the database dedicated to Ella Fitzgerald, Pearl Bailey, Alan Shepard, Tom Wolfe, William Styron, or Katie Couric.
 
Also see . . .  Virginia Legends Walk web site. (Submitted on July 29, 2010, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.)
 
Categories. Notable Persons
 
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
14. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
15. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
16. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
17. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
18. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
19. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
20. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
21. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
22. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
23. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
24. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
25. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
26. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
27. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
28. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
29. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
30. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
31. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
32. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
36. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
37. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
38. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
39. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
42. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
43. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
44. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
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By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
45. Virginia Legends Walk Marker
This is the northern entrance of the Virginia Legends Walk. Note the Grace Sherwood plaque, posted at both entrances, is the only plaque to appear twice on the walk.
Bringing Virginia Legends to Life stage. image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., July 20, 2010
46. Bringing Virginia Legends to Life stage.
At the southern entrance to the Virginia Legends walk is a stage where performers "bring to life" the legends during nightly shows.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 28, 2010, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,200 times since then and 29 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on July 28, 2010, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.   8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19. submitted on July 29, 2010, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.   20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31. submitted on July 30, 2010, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.   32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46. submitted on July 31, 2010, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.
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