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Logansport in Cass County, Indiana — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Wabash & Erie Canal

 
 
Wabash & Erie Canal Marker image. Click for full size.
By Courtesy:: Carly C. Kindig, September 5, 2010
1. Wabash & Erie Canal Marker
Inscription. Trade and emigration route from Lake Erie to Evansville. Completed through Logansport 1840. Followed Erie Avenue and 5th Street, crossing Eel River by wooden aqueduct. Abandoned about 1876.
 
Erected 1966 by Indiana Sesquicentennial Commission. (Marker Number 09.1966.1.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Indiana State Historical Bureau Markers, and the Wabash & Erie Canal marker series.
 
Location. 40° 45.317′ N, 86° 21.894′ W. Marker is in Logansport, Indiana, in Cass County. Marker is at the intersection of North 5th Street and North Street, on the left when traveling north on North 5th Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Logansport IN 46947, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 7 other markers are within 14 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Early Masonic Temple (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Clock Tower (about 400 feet away); W. W. I War Memorial - Cass County Indiana (about 700 feet away); Potawatomi Encampment (approx. 0.7 miles away); Trail of Death (approx. 9.9 miles away); Sycamore Row (approx. 10.5 miles away); Camden / Jackson Township (approx. 13.7 miles away).
 
Regarding Wabash & Erie Canal. Courtesy
Looking North - - Wabash & Erie Canal Marker image. Click for full size.
By Courtesy:: Carly C. Kindig, September 5, 2010
2. Looking North - - Wabash & Erie Canal Marker
of the Indiana Historical Bureau::

""Report (Prepared by the Indiana Historical Bureau 2010)

The first sentence of the marker is correct. The Wabash and Erie Canal was a trade route that linked Lake Erie to Evansville. According to Ralph D. Gray’s essay “The Canal Era in Indiana” from Transportation and the Early Nation, county populations bordering the canal grew from 12,000 before the canal in 1835, to 60,000 in 1845, to 150,000 in 1855. However, the marker’s second sentence is slightly incorrect. A search of the Logansport newspapers revealed that the canal was opened to that city’s traffic in 1839, not 1840.

An exact date for the canal’s completion through Logansport could not be determined because IHB staff was not able to locate several issues of the Logansport Herald or the Logansport Telegraph for April and most of May, 1839. However, the Telegraph of March 23, 1839 reported, “The Wabash and Erie Canal will be opened for navigation between Logansport and Fort Wayne, about the first of April.” Then on May 28, 1839, the Herald reported, “The Canal. - Boats are arriving almost daily. Business is becoming better every day. In a few days the water will, we understand, be let in to Gorgetown [sic] six or eight miles below.” There were also advertisements running for two canal cargo companies (the Wabash and Erie
Long North View - - Wabash & Erie Canal Marker image. Click for full size.
By Courtesy:: Carly C. Kindig, September 5, 2010
3. Long North View - - Wabash & Erie Canal Marker
Packet Boat Company and Spencer, Rice, & Hopkins Storage, Forwarding, and Commission) in the 1839 Herald and Telegraph.

Logansport Weekly Journal on May 3, 1873 there was a wooden aqueduct. The marker states that the canal was abandoned “about 1876,” and while this statement is acceptable because of the qualifying “about,” the correct date is probably 1875. Several county histories as well as the 1878 Combination Atlas Map of Cass County disagree, and give 1875 as the abandonment date. Newspaper accounts reveal that in 1873 the Cass County Commissioners, under public pressure, appropriated $5,000 to provide for repair of the canal. It is evident from these articles that the canal was not in good shape. In May, 1875, the Logansport Weekly Journal reported that “The ‘Iceberg’…arrived last Monday, being the first canal boat of the season.” In the Weekly Journal’s year-end recap of local happenings for 1875 it noted, “May 3. The canal boat Iceberg…was the first and last arrival of the season.” There was no recollection whatsoever of canal activity in the Weekly Journal’s year-end review for 1876. ""
 
Also see . . .
1. "Wabash & Erie Canal Park" - Delphi, Indiana::. This organization has the greatest concentration and most of the known remains of the Wabash & Erie Canal
Looking South - - Wabash & Erie Canal Marker image. Click for full size.
By Courtesy:: Carly C. Kindig, September 5, 2010
4. Looking South - - Wabash & Erie Canal Marker
in Indiana. The many links on this web site are very interesting and fun to work with. (Submitted on September 7, 2010, by Al Wolf of Veedersburg, Indiana.) 

2. "The men who dug the Canal" ::. A light and lively song with many old photos of canal builders in the process of digging a canal. (Submitted on September 7, 2010, by Al Wolf of Veedersburg, Indiana.) 

3. "Angel of the Canal" ::. Many fell ill digging canals. In frontier days there were few doctors and medicine was scarce. In the Brecksville, Ohio area Mrs. Johnson became known as the "Angel of the Canal" for her care of the ill. (Submitted on September 7, 2010, by Al Wolf of Veedersburg, Indiana.) 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceMan-Made FeaturesWaterways & Vessels
 
Looking North/East - - Wabash & Erie Canal Marker image. Click for full size.
By Courtesy:: Carly C. Kindig, September 5, 2010
5. Looking North/East - - Wabash & Erie Canal Marker
Marker can be seen on the lower left of this photo by the telephone pole.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 6, 2017. This page originally submitted on September 7, 2010, by Al Wolf of Veedersburg, Indiana. This page has been viewed 1,225 times since then and 49 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on September 7, 2010, by Al Wolf of Veedersburg, Indiana. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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