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Camden in Knox County, Maine — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Edna St. Vincent Millay

1892 — 1950

 
 
Edna St. Vincent Millay Marker image. Click for full size.
By Roger W. Sinnott, September 5, 2010
1. Edna St. Vincent Millay Marker
Inscription.
“All I could see from where I stood
Was three long mountains and a wood;
I turned and looked another way,
And saw three islands in a bay.
So with my eyes I traced the line
Of the horizon, thin and fine,
Straight around till I was come
Back to where I’d started from;
And all I saw from where I stood
Was three long mountains and a wood.”

   — First stanza “Renascence,” by Edna St. Vincent Millay written in 1910 in the environs of Mount Battie

At the age of eighteen, a frail girl with flaming red hair left her home in early morning to climb her favorite Camden Hills, where so deeply affected by her surroundings, she wrote “Renascence.” The poem received immediate public acclaim and was the inspired beginning of the career of America’s finest lyric poet.

 
Erected 1967 by a gift of Ida Povich Dondis.
 
Location. 44° 13.366′ N, 69° 4.156′ W. Marker is in Camden, Maine, in Knox County. Marker can be reached from Mount Battie Road. Touch for map. Marker is on the summit of Mount Battie near the high end of Mount Battie Road, on a large rock beside the memorial
Mount Battie Memorial Tower image. Click for full size.
By Roger W. Sinnott, September 5, 2010
2. Mount Battie Memorial Tower
The marker faces the tower and is mounted on the large boulder at left.
lookout tower. Marker is in this post office area: Camden ME 04843, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Mount Battie Memorial Tower (here, next to this marker); Spanish-American War Memorial (approx. 0.8 miles away); Civil War Memorial (approx. 0.8 miles away); The Schooner Grace Bailey / The Schooner Mercantile (approx. 0.9 miles away); French's Beach (approx. 5 miles away); Lincolnville War of 1812 Cannon (approx. 5.1 miles away); The Boys of Hope (approx. 5.3 miles away); Lincolnville Center (approx. 5.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Camden.
 
Also see . . .
1. Wikipedia entry for Edna St. Vincent Millay. (Submitted on September 8, 2010, by Roger W. Sinnott of Chelmsford, Massachusetts.)
2. Renascence. in Renascence, and other poems, 1917, by Edna St. Vincent Millay, Internet Archive. (Submitted on May 6, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Categories. Arts, Letters, Music
 
Camden Harbor from Mount Battie image. Click for full size.
By Roger W. Sinnott, September 5, 2010
3. Camden Harbor from Mount Battie
Spectacular views like this moved Edna St. Vincent Millay to write her first major poem.
Edna St. Vincent Millay image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 2, 2011
4. Edna St. Vincent Millay
This 1934 portrait by Charles Ellis hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“Literarily and temperamentally precocious, the poet Edna St. Vincent Millay exemplified the spirit of the ‘Roaring Twenties’ and the emancipation of American Women. She started writing as a child an became a rebellious student at Vassar College. In 1917 she move to Greenwich Village, the center of avant-garde and rebel culture. She won the Pulitzer Prize for The Harp-Weaver in 1923. Poetically, Millay was a romantic, inspired by the ecstatic visions of John Keats and William Wordsworth; he first notable poem ‘Renascence’ (1912) spoke of nature that ‘breathed my soul back into me.’ Her famous quatrain ‘First Fig’ (1920) celebrates abandonment:

My Candle burns at both ends;
     It will not last the night;
But ah, my foes, and oh, my friends—
     It gives a lovely light.

Millay's romanticism was at odds with literary modernism, and her reputation has declined. However, during the 1920s she exemplified the age that she did so much to define.” — National Portrait Gallery.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 8, 2010, by Roger W. Sinnott of Chelmsford, Massachusetts. This page has been viewed 1,488 times since then and 33 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on September 8, 2010, by Roger W. Sinnott of Chelmsford, Massachusetts.   4. submitted on May 5, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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