Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Salt Lake City in Salt Lake County, Utah — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

The Salt Lake Theatre

 
 
The Salt Lake Theatre Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, June 18, 2007
1. The Salt Lake Theatre Marker
The bronze bas-relief is signed “Mahonri” and dated 1940 in the lower right.
Inscription.
Long, long be my heart with such memories filled;
like the vase in which roses have once been distilled.
You may break, you may shatter the vase if you will,
but the scent of the roses will hang ’round it still.
Thomas Moore

“The people must have amusement as well as religion” —Brigham Young

The Salt Lake Theatre, 1860–1923, erected on this site under the direction of President Brigham Young, dedicated March 6, 1862.
 
Erected 1940 by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints & The Mountain States Telephone & Telegraph Co.
 
Location. 40° 46.042′ N, 111° 53.307′ W. Marker is in Salt Lake City, Utah, in Salt Lake County. Marker is at the intersection of South State Street and 100 South, on the right when traveling south on South State Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 70 S State Street, Salt Lake City UT 84111, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Social Hall (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Social Hall (about 300 feet away); First Security Branch of Wells Fargo
"The people must have amusement as well as religion." image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, June 18, 2007
2. "The people must have amusement as well as religion."
(about 700 feet away); Pioneer Telegraph Office (about 700 feet away); The Old Clock (about 800 feet away); The Lion House (approx. 0.2 miles away); A Private School House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Brigham Young’s Office (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Salt Lake City.
 
Regarding The Salt Lake Theatre. Built in 1861 on the northwest corner of State Street and First South Street, it survived two-thirds of a century before it was razed in 1928.
 
Also see . . .
1. Salt Lake Theatre. Article by Ronald W. Walker, Utah History Encyclopedia. (Submitted on June 28, 2007.) 

2. Celebrating the Art of Mahonri Young. Could the sculptor of this bronze be Mahonri Young (1877–1957)? This link is for an illustrated article by Norma S. Davis that describes his work and has a brief biographical sketch of the celebrated Salt Lake City artist who was one of Brigham Young’s grandchildren. (Submitted on June 28, 2007, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. The Mountain Bell
The Salt Lake Theatre Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, June 18, 2007
3. The Salt Lake Theatre Marker
Building

This marker is on the wall of what was once called Mountain Bell building. Mountain Bell, one of the original 24 Bell Telephone Companies, served the states of Colorado, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, and a little piece of southwestern Texas. The legal name of Mountain Bell was “Mountain States Telephone & Telegraph Co.”, the name on the marker. It was owned by the American Telephone and Telegraph Co. (AT&T) for most of the 20th century. After the government forced AT&T to divest itself of its local telephone companies in 1984, Mountain Bell became one of the US West companies. When US West was acquired in 2000 by Qwest Communications International, Inc. all of its local telephone companies were named Qwest and this building became the Qwest building.
    — Submitted June 27, 2007, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.

2. “Farewell!—But Whenever You Welcome the Hour” by Thomas Moore
The four lines of poetry quoted on this marker are from a poem by the popular Irish poet Thomas Moore (1780–1853).
This is the complete poem.


Farewell!—but whenever you welcome the hour.
That awakens the night-song of mirth in your bower,
Then think of the friend who once welcomed it
Detail from Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, June 18, 2007
4. Detail from Marker
too,
And forgot his own griefs to be happy with you.
His griefs may return, not a hope may remain
Of the few that have brightened his pathway of pain.
But he ne’er will forget the short vision, that threw
Its enchantment around him, while lingering with you.
And still on that evening, when pleasure fills up
To the highest top sparkle each heart and each cup,
Where’er my path lies, be it gloomy or bright,
My soul, happy friends, shall be with you that night;

Shall join in your revels, your sports, and your wiles,
And return to me, beaming all o’er with your smiles—
Too blest, if it tells me that, mid the gay cheer
Some kind voice had murmured, “I wish he were here!”

Let Fate do her worst, there are relics of joy,
Bright dreams of the past, which she cannot destroy;
Which come in the night-time of sorrow and care,
And bring back the features that joy used to wear.
Long, long be my heart with such memories filled!
Like the vase, in which roses have once been distilled—
You may break, you may shatter the vase, if you will,
But the scent of the roses will hang round it still.
    — Submitted June 27, 2007, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.

 
Categories. EntertainmentNotable Buildings
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 25, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,907 times since then and 55 times this year. Last updated on September 15, 2010, by Bryan R. Bauer of Kearns, Ut 84118. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on June 25, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement