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Flat Run in Orange County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Germanna Ford

Grant Takes Command

 

óLee Vs. Grant - The 1864 Campaign ó

 
Germanna Ford - Grant Takes Command image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 10, 2007
1. Germanna Ford - Grant Takes Command
Marker is the on the Lee vs Grant 1864 Campaign of the Virginia Civil War Trails.
Inscription. In March 1864, President Abraham Lincoln placed Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in charge of the Unionís overall military effort. Grantís strategy was simple: attack the Confederates simultaneously on all fronts, overwhelming them by sheer force of numbers. His plan called for Gen. William T. Sherman to drive towards Atlanta from Chattanooga while Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks moved from New Orleans towards Mobile. In Virginia, Gen. George G. Meadeís Army of the Potomac was to engage Leeís attention south of the Rapidan River. At the same time, smaller Union armies would move up the Shenandoah Valley and against Richmond from the south.

To win the war, Grant realized that he must first destroy the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia. He told Meade, “Leeís army will be your objective point. Whereever Lee goes, there you will go also.” To make sure that Meade used the Army of the Potomac to its full potential, Grant made his headquarters with the army infusing it with his own relentless drive and determination. The result was six weeks of incessant combat and more than 50,000 Union casualties.

“...I therefore determined, first, to use the greatest number of troops practicable against the armed force of the enemy...; second, to hammer continuously against the armed force of the enemy and his resources, until
Lee vs Grant - Civil War Trails markers image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 10, 2007
2. Lee vs Grant - Civil War Trails markers
by mere attrition, if in no other way, there should be nothing left of him.”
—U.S. Grant
 
Erected by Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 38° 22.632′ N, 77° 46.91′ W. Marker is in Flat Run, Virginia, in Orange County. Marker is at the intersection of Germanna Highway (Virginia Route 3) and the Germanna Community College Entrance (Virginia Route 375), on the right when traveling south on Germanna Highway. Touch for map. Just north of Route 760. Marker is in this post office area: Locust Grove VA 22508, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named Germanna Ford (here, next to this marker); Germanna (was about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line but has been reported missing. ); a different marker also named Germanna Ford (was about 500 feet away but has been reported missing. ); Culpeper County / Orange County (approx. 0.2 miles away); The "Enchanted Castle" at Germanna, circa 1720-1750 (approx. 0.3 miles away); Spotswood Family Cemetery (approx. 3 miles away); Gordon's Flank Attack (approx. 3 miles away); Captain John Spotswood (approx. 3 miles away).
 
Regarding Germanna Ford. On the upper left is a wartime sketch showing As the Union army crossed the river, Grant sat on a log overlooking Germanna Ford and penned a dispatch to Washington, "The crossing of the Rapidan effected," he reported. "Forty-eight hours now will demonstrate whether the enemy intends giving battle this side of Richmond." On the right a strategic map of the southeastern United States illustrates the situation described in the text.
 
Also see . . .  Civil War Trails – Lee vs. Grant: The 1864 Overland Campaign Tour. (Submitted on March 6, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 17, 2007, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,387 times since then and 68 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on November 17, 2007, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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