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Sumter in Sumter County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Battle of Dingle's Mill

 
 
Battle of Dingle's Mill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2010
1. Battle of Dingle's Mill Marker
Inscription. (Front text)
Here on Apr. 9, 1865, the day of Gen. Lee's surrender, was fought one of the last battles of the War between the States. 158 Confederates rallied by Col. Geo. W. Lee stopped, for several hours, the advance of 2700 Union troops under Gen. Edward E. Potter. Casualties: Confederate 12; Union 26.
(Reverse text)
April 9, 1865
A Confederate homeguard of old men, boys, and convalescents here made a gallant stand in an effort to halt Potter's Raid, an expedition which left Georgetown on April 5, laid waste the country, and by April 21 had accomplished its chief objective—the destruction of the railroads between the Pedee and Wateree.
 
Erected 1956 by Sumter County Historical Commission. (Marker Number 43-10.)
 
Location. 33° 52.556′ N, 80° 20.143′ W. Marker is in Sumter, South Carolina, in Sumter County. Marker is on Manning Road (U.S. 521), on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Located on north side of Turkey Creek Bridge. Marker is in this post office area: Sumter SC 29150, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Site of The Battle of Dingle's Mill (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Battle of Dingles Mill
Battle of Dingle's Mill Marker, reverse side image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2010
2. Battle of Dingle's Mill Marker, reverse side
(a few steps from this marker); Henry J. Maxwell Farm (approx. 1.3 miles away); Kendall Institute (approx. 2.5 miles away); First Baptist Church (approx. 2.7 miles away); Mount Pisgah African Methodist Episcopal Church (approx. 2.9 miles away); Clara Louise Kellogg (approx. 3 miles away); St. Anne Catholic Church (approx. 3.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sumter.
 
Regarding Battle of Dingle's Mill. Railroads played a key role in the war, dictating the movement of armies and even the location of battles. They were also prime targets. On his sweep through South Carolina, Sherman discovered that there were several trains loaded with military supplies south of his line of march on the Wilmington & Manchester RR that ran through Sumter. He ordered that a force be organized from the various Federal garrison units on the Carolina coast to march inland and destroy the trains and their cargo, "even if it should cost 500 men." A provisional division of 2,500 men, commanded by General Edward E. Potter, was assembled consisting of two brigades of white
Battle of Dingle's Mill Markers image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 9, 2010
3. Battle of Dingle's Mill Markers
and black infantry, plus cavalry, engineer and artillery companies.
The stage was set for a raid lasting 16 days, much of which took place AFTER Lee has surrendered.
 
Also see . . .  20th South Carolina -Militia of State Troops -Sumter District, South Carolina. The Battle of Dingle's Mill April 9, 1865 (Information from the Sumter Watchman June 6, 13, & 20, 1866.) Colonel G.W. Lee, commander of the 20th Regiment South Carolina Militia... (Submitted on July 8, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Battle of Dingle's Mill Markers image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 7, 2010
4. Battle of Dingle's Mill Markers
* See nearby markers
Battle of Dingle's Mill Battleground: Confederate Tribute left, Union Tribute right image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 7, 2010
5. Battle of Dingle's Mill Battleground: Confederate Tribute left, Union Tribute right
Battle of Dingle's Mill Union Tribute image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 7, 2010
6. Battle of Dingle's Mill Union Tribute
This spot dedicated to the honor
of three Union soldiers who were
killed and buried in a common grave
somewhere on this battle field
——
* Private Edward Bristol
157th N.Y. Volunteers (Infantry)
* Private William Post
157th N.Y. Volunteers (Infantry)
*Private William Utter
56th N.Y. Volunteers (Infantry)
——
Rest In Peace
Battle of Dingle's Mill Marker, Confederate Tribute image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 9, 2010
7. Battle of Dingle's Mill Marker, Confederate Tribute
Battle of Dingles Mill
Killed

Lt Alex. McQueen- Garden's BatteryPalmetto Battery
Lt. Raphael Pampere S.C. Siege Train
Sgt. Joseph H. Long 20th S.C. Militia
Dr.John Thompson 20th R S.C Militia
Pvt. C.N. Harbin 2nd S.C. Reserves
Pvt. William Reeder Co. A S.C. Siege Train
Wounded
Pvt. William Wingate 20th S.C. Militia
Pvt. Wade Newman Unit unknown
Pvt. Potts Davis 20th S.C. Militia
Pvt. William Baker Company D 1st S.C. Infantry
Pvt. Charles McCoy 20th S.C. Militia
Pvt. Fahm Georgia Regiment
Pvt. C.C. Fabib 22nd Georgia Regiment
Pvt. William Harral 20th S.C. Militia
Captured
Pvt. H.D. Lincoln 20th Regiment S.C. Militia
Pvt. William Wotton, 20th S.C. Militia
Potter's Raid image. Click for full size.
By Dinkle's Mill Battleground
8. Potter's Raid
Battle of Dingle's Mill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 9, 2010
9. Battle of Dingle's Mill Marker
two working pieces of artillery were commanded by Lt. William Alexander McQueen and a patient of Sumter hospital, Lt Pamerya, an artilleryman from New Orleans
Battle of Dingle's Mill Marker, looking south along Manning Road (US 521) image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 7, 2010
10. Battle of Dingle's Mill Marker, looking south along Manning Road (US 521)
Massachusetts Commandery Collection: Gen. Edward E. Potter image. Click for full size.
Militaty Order of the Loyal Legion United States
11. Massachusetts Commandery Collection: Gen. Edward E. Potter
U.S. Army Military History Institute, Carlisle Barracks, Pa.
A native of New York, Potter enlisted as a captain (February 3, 1862), was appointed lieutenant colonel (October 1, 1862), and was then raised to brigadier general (November 29, 1862).
Saturday morning, April 9, 1865, This was the same day of Lee's surrender in Appomatox, but no one in Sumter knew that the war had ended. Potter set out for Sumter and its defenders marched out the Manning Road to meet him at Dingle's Mill. About 2:00 p.m. the enemy came within range and the small force defending Sumter opened fire. Although Potter's first and second charges were driven back, further resistance became impossible and a general retreat was called. Potter did not pursue. He knew that he had opened up the road into Sumter and his men were weary. Late in the afternoon of the next day, Potter's cavalry rode up Main Street into Liberty Street and then to the depot where they camped
Battle of Dingle's Mill Sequence of Events image. Click for full size.
By Battle of Dingle's Mill Battleground
12. Battle of Dingle's Mill Sequence of Events
April 5th thru April 21st, 1865
Battle of Dingle's Mill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 7, 2010
13. Battle of Dingle's Mill Marker
Confederate Tribute in foreground
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 18, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 2,285 times since then and 439 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on September 18, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   9, 10, 11, 12, 13. submitted on September 19, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.
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