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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Sandston in Henrico County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

White Oak Swamp

Controversy for Stonewall Jackson

 

—1862 Peninsula Campaign —

 
White Oak Swamp Civil War Trails marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 25, 2007
1. White Oak Swamp Civil War Trails marker
Inscription. After the twilight battle at Savage’s Station on June 29, 1862, the Army of the Potomac abandoned the final remnants of its line in front of Richmond and retreated through the darkness toward the James River. Once across White Oak Swamp, the Union army deployed at several key spots to challenge the Confederate pursuit.

Here at White Oak Swamp Bridge, two Federal divisions – led by Gen. William F. Smith and Gen. Israel Richardson – occupied the heights one-third of a mile south of the swamp. Confederate Gen. Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson, at the head of 25,000 men, arrived on the north bank of the swamp at noon on June 30 and found the bridge here destroyed. The noise of the heavy fighting at Glendale, three miles to the southwest, “made me eager to press forward,” Jackson later wrote, but he was unable to do so during the remaining eight hours of daylight. The failure of this and two of the other three Confederate columns to press forward robbed Lee of his offensive punch, and allowed for a successful Union defense of the roads to the James River.
 
Erected by Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 37° 
White Oak Swamp Battle Map image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 25, 2007
2. White Oak Swamp Battle Map
Lee developed a complex plan on June 30 that involved the convergence of four different columns of infantry in pursuit of McClellan’s retreat. Successful execution of the plan offered great rewards, as it had the potential to block the Union army from its bases on the James River.
28.142′ N, 77° 12.543′ W. Marker is near Sandston, Virginia, in Henrico County. Marker is at the intersection of Elko Road (County Route 156), on the right when traveling south on Elko Road. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Sandston VA 23150, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named White Oak Swamp (a few steps from this marker); Seven Days Battles (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Seven Days Battles (approx. 0.4 miles away); a different marker also named Seven Days Battles (approx. 0.4 miles away); Decoy Airfield (approx. 1.4 miles away); Elko Community Center (approx. 1.7 miles away); Riddell's Shop (approx. 2.1 miles away); Glendale (Frayser’s Farm) (approx. 2.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sandston.
 
More about this marker. In the upper center is "This contemporary sketch by famous combat artist Alfred Waud shows Union batteries dueling with Jackson’s artillery across White Oak Swamp. The road across the swamp can be seen in the right center, directly above one of the cannons."

On the upper right is a drawing showing "Union soldiers destroying the White Oak Swamp Bridge on the morning of June 30. One straggler crossed the bridge while work
White Oak Swamp - Controversy for Stonewall Jackson image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 25, 2007
3. White Oak Swamp - Controversy for Stonewall Jackson
This marker is part of the 1862 Peninsula Campaign of the Virginia Civil War Trails.
parties 'were building a huge fire by its side.' Within minutes, the flames ate away the wood and the timbers collapsed into the water, effectively delaying Confederate pursuit."

A center map is captioned: "Lee developed a complex plan on June 30 that involved the convergence of four different columns of infantry in pursuit of McClellan’s retreat. Successful execution of the plan offered great rewards, as it had the potential to block the Union army from its bases on the James River."


A portrait of General Jackson on the right side is captioned, "By the summer of 1862, Stonewall Jackson had achieved international fame as a Confederate general. His rapid climb in the public’s eye suffered a temporary setback during the Seven Day’s Battles. Jackson’s actions here at White Oak Swamp were the most controversial of his career."
 
Also see . . .
1. Battle of White Oak Swamp. (Submitted on November 28, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
2. White Oak Swamp. Details about the bridge, swamp, and the marker placement with regard to the historical landmarks. (Submitted on November 28, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
White Oak Swamp image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, November 25, 2009
4. White Oak Swamp
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 20, 2007, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 2,130 times since then and 72 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 20, 2007, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   4. submitted on November 25, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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