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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
El Paso in El Paso County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Fort Bliss Buffalo Soldiers Memorial

 
 
Fort Bliss Buffalo Soldiers Memorial - History image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, November 4, 2010
1. Fort Bliss Buffalo Soldiers Memorial - History
Inscription.
History
In 1866, One year after the end of the Civil War and more than six months after the 13th Amendment abolishing slavery was enacted Congress had the need to reorganize the peacetime Regular Army. Recognizing the Military merits of Black Soldiers, four Black Infantry Regiments and two Segregated Regiments of Black Cavalry were authorized. The Ninth and Tenth United States Cavalry were destined to become most decorated of all United States Military Regiments.

Nickname
It is believed that the nickname Buffalo Soldiers began with the Cheyenne Warriors in 1867. The Black Soldiers were ferocious and courageous in battle, even when outnumbered. Out of Respect, the Cheyenne referred to these hard-fighting black men as "Buffalo Soldiers" – reportedly because their hair resembled that of the revered Bison. Because the buffalo was a sacred animal to the Indians, the Cavalry men accepted the title with great pride. The name became a highly respected American Legacy.

10 Buffalo Soldiers Buried at Fort Bliss
Charlie Bates, 10th Cavalry MSG Donnie Brown, 10th Cavalry Sgt. Sheldon Colbert, 10th Cavalry Henry Demand, 10th Cavalry Pvt. Frank Coleman, 10th Cavalry Pvt. Richard Holt, 10th Cavalry Wagoneer Grover Mapp, 10th Cavalry
Fort Bliss Buffalo Soldiers Memorial - Nickname image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, November 4, 2010
2. Fort Bliss Buffalo Soldiers Memorial - Nickname
Pvt. Roy McCann, 9th Cavalry Pvt. James Motjoy, 9th Cavalry Sgt. Edward Walker, 10th Cavalry
10th Cavalry Buffalo soldiers killed during the Battle of Carrizal
On June 21, 1916 in Carrizal, Mexico
Capt. Charles T. Boyd, 10th Calvary 1st Lt. Henry R. Adair, 10th Calvary 1st Sgt. William Winrow, Troop C Sgt. Will Hines, Troop C Pvt. Thomas Moses, Troop C Horseshoer Lee Talbott, Troop C Pvt. DeWitt Rucker, Troop K Pvt. Charley Matthews, Troop K Pvt. James E. Day, Troop K
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Buffalo Soldiers marker series.
 
Location. 31° 46.853′ N, 106° 26.953′ W. Marker is in El Paso, Texas, in El Paso County. Marker can be reached from North Stevens Street 0.1 miles south of East Yandell Drive. Touch for map. Memorial is located at the Concordia Cemetery. Enter from North Stevens Street. Marker is in this post office area: El Paso TX 79903, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Concordia Cemetery (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); John Wesley Hardin (about 500 feet away); The Mormon Plot in Concordia Cemetery (about 600 feet away); Henry O. Flipper
10 Buffalo Soldiers Buried at Fort Bliss - image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, November 4, 2010
3. 10 Buffalo Soldiers Buried at Fort Bliss -
10th Cavalry Buffalo Soldiers Killed During the Battle of Carrizal
(approx. 0.4 miles away); Dr. Lawrence A. Nixon (approx. 0.4 miles away); Site of Camp Concordia and Fort Bliss (approx. half a mile away); Henry C. Trost (approx. 0.6 miles away); Victoriano Huerta (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in El Paso.
 
Also see . . .  Battle of Carrizal. Wikipedia Article. (Submitted on November 24, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.) 
 
Additional keywords. Buffalo Soldiers; Border War (1910–1918)
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesMilitary
 
Fort Bliss Buffalo Soldiers Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, November 4, 2010
4. Fort Bliss Buffalo Soldiers Memorial
Fort Bliss Buffalo Soldiers Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, November 4, 2010
5. Fort Bliss Buffalo Soldiers Memorial
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 16, 2010, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. This page has been viewed 1,290 times since then and 99 times this year. Last updated on November 24, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on November 16, 2010, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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