Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Pilot Knob in Iron County, Missouri — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Battle of Pilot Knob

Pilot Knob Mountain

 
 
Battle of Pilot Knob Marker image. Click for full size.
By Homer Swain, September 24, 2010
1. Battle of Pilot Knob Marker
Inscription.
Battle of Pilot Knob
Pilot Knob Mountain
September 27, 1864
1:00 P.M. - 2:30 P.M.
Prior to the Confederate attack on Ft. Davidson a detachment of 3rd M.S.M. Cavalry was forced off Pilot Knob Mountain by Slemons' and McCray's Rebel Brigades. The 3rd M.S.M.'s commanding officer, Major James Wilson, was taken prisoner. After the battle he was executed by the rebels. During the assault on Ft. Davidson, Slemons' and McCray's Brigades anchored the right wing of the Confederate army at the base of Pilot Knob Mt.
 
Location. 37° 37.221′ N, 90° 38.415′ W. Marker is in Pilot Knob, Missouri, in Iron County. Marker can be reached from S. McCune Street south of Maple Street (Missouri Highway 221), on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located at a roadside pullout next to Battle of Pilot Knob State Historic Site. Marker is in this post office area: Pilot Knob MO 63663, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Fort Davidson (a few steps from this marker); The Doomed Assault (within shouting distance of this marker); The Moat (within shouting distance of this marker); The Powder Magazine (within shouting
Close Up of Inscription image. Click for full size.
By Homer Swain, September 24, 2010
2. Close Up of Inscription
distance of this marker); The Struggle for the Mountains (within shouting distance of this marker); The Fight for Ironton (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named The Battle of Pilot Knob (about 400 feet away); a different marker also named Battle of Pilot Knob (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Pilot Knob.
 
More about this marker. The marker is one of 16 Missouri red granite historical markers interpreting the Battle of Pilot Knob and is Marker #10 on the Battle of Pilot Knob Driving Tour.
 
Also see . . .
1. Battle of Pilot Knob State Historic Site. The official website of this state park. (Submitted on October 27, 2016, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.) 

2. Tour: The Battle of Pilot Knob. A detailed virtual tour of the battle from The Civil War Muse. (Submitted on October 27, 2016, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Confederate Six-Pounder Gun
From the sign below the cannon on display at the museum:
This iron six-pounder filed gun is believed to be one of two Confederate cannons emplaced on Shephard's Mountain
Battle of Pilot Knob — Pilot Knob Mountain Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, October 14, 2016
3. Battle of Pilot Knob — Pilot Knob Mountain Marker
during the Battle of Pilot Knob. After opening fire on Fort Davidson, this piece was dismounted while the other cannon was hauled away to escape Federal fire. The dismounted gun could not be retrieved from the mountain and was abandoned.

In the early 1900s, loggers found the gun and dragged it to a farm near Pilot Knob. In 1967, St. Louis Civil War enthusiast John L. Wagner learned about the gun, purchased it and restored it for use in reenactments. The Missouri Department of Natural Resources acquired this unique artifact from Wagner for display in the visitor center planned for Fort Davidson State Historic Site.

Technical Data:
Missouri State Museum researchers believe that this gun belonged to Capt. H.C. Hynson's Texas Battery. The barrel is not typical of Civil War artillery, but is similar to the U.S. Model 1831 iron six-pounder. The 65-inch barrel has a bore of 3.675 inches and was found to be loaded with two six-pound solid shot. According to an eyewitness, the gun was dismounted by a shot from a Federal 32-pounder siege gun that killed and wounded 12 men.
    — Submitted November 27, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Marker at Roadside Pullout image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, October 14, 2016
4. Marker at Roadside Pullout
View to southeast, remains of Fort Davidson visible behind cannons
Confederate Iron 6-pdr Cannon image. Click for full size.
By Homer Swain, September 25, 2010
5. Confederate Iron 6-pdr Cannon
Located in the historic site museum. See Commentary for description.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 27, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 27, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 877 times since then and 28 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on November 27, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3, 4. submitted on October 27, 2016, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.   5. submitted on November 27, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
Paid Advertisement