Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Prince George in Prince George County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Prince George Court House

Long, Hot March

 

—Lee Vs. Grant - The 1864 Campaign —

 
"Prince George Court House  -  Long, Hot March" Civil War Trails marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 25, 2007
1. "Prince George Court House - Long, Hot March" Civil War Trails marker
Inscription. After crossing the James River, Gen. Gouverneur Warren’s Fifth Corps and Gen. Ambrose Burnside’s Ninth Corps were ordered to move toward Petersburg. One of two primary routes of advance, Prince George Court House Road (Road 106) was used by more than 40,000 Union troops on June 15, 1864, a hot and dusty day. “For three hours of the march only one rest of 15 minutes was had,” a Union soldier wrote. When the Fifth Corp arrived at Prince George Court House, however, they were rewarded with an hour-long coffee break.

“At three P.M. under a sweltering sun, our march was resumed in the direction of Petersburg. Great destruction of property was visible on the march. People, frightened by the advance of the Yankee army, had forsaken their houses and fled. Such places were destroyed. Had the inhabitants remained at home, the house, at least, would not have been molested. About sundown we passed Prince George Court House….With great difficulty the boys obtained water for their coffee, most of them being compelled to take it from the tracks of horses where they had been led to watering, in the swamps nearby.”
- Chaplain Louis N. Boudrye, 5th New York Cavalry.

The new Prince George Courthouse is the fifth such building to serve the county since 1655. The third courthouse was destroyed between
Prince George Court House  -  Long, Hot March image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 25, 2007
2. Prince George Court House - Long, Hot March
Marker is part of the "Lee vs Grant – The 1864 Campaign" trail of the Virginia Civil War Trails.
June 1864 and April 1865. In 1865, after the war was over, the fourth courthouse was built. It was used until 1992.

(Sidebar Quote): “[The troops] suffered much from thirst, and at one time my tongue actually hung out and was covered with dust, I could spit cotton without exaggeration.”
- Union soldier, June 1864
 
Erected by Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 37° 13.253′ N, 77° 17.237′ W. Marker is in Prince George, Virginia, in Prince George County. Marker is on Courthouse Road (Virginia Route 106), on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is one of two Civil War Trail markers located near the Court House. Marker is in this post office area: Prince George VA 23875, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named Prince George Court House (here, next to this marker); Confederate Soldiers of Prince George Co. (within shouting distance of this marker); History at Prince George Courthouse (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Jordan's Point (approx. 2.6 miles away); Bailey's Creek (approx. 2.6 miles away); The Beefsteak Raid (approx. 2.6 miles away); New Bohemia, VA (approx. 3.1 miles away); In Defense of the Nation (approx. 3.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Prince George.
 
More about this marker. The marker displays portraits of Gens. Burnside and Warren in the upper center. A map showing the Civil War Trails tour route and related civil war sites is on the right side of the marker.
 
Also see . . .  Civil War Trails – Lee vs. Grant: The 1864 Overland Campaign Tour. (Submitted on March 6, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 30, 2007, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,056 times since then and 29 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on November 30, 2007, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement