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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Keedysville in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Pry Family Upheaval

 
 
Pry Family Upheaval Marker image. Click for full size.
February 21, 2011
1. Pry Family Upheaval Marker
Inscription. A knock on the door on September 16, 1862, forever changed the lives of Philip and Elizabeth Pry. For almost twenty years, the Prys prospered on this 140-acre farm along Antietam Creek while raising their family of six children. With Confederate forces gathering on the other side of the Antietam, Gen. George McClellan positioned the Union Army on this side and selected the Pry home to serve as his headquarters.

Thousands of soldiers and horses descended on this farm. Fences were knocked down, crops trampled, loads of hay confiscated, livestock taken to feed the army, and the house and barn converted into field hospitals.

After the battle, Phillip Pry filed numerous claims with the War Department for damages to his farm. Portions of the claims were paid, other charges were disputed and there was an investigation of overpayment. The financial burden proved too much. In 1874 the Prys sold their home and moved to Tennessee.
 
Erected by Antietam National Battlefield - National Park Service - U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 39° 28.552′ N, 77° 42.818′ W. Marker is near Keedysville, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker can be reached from Shepherdstown Pike (Maryland Route 34). Touch for map
Pry Family Upheaval Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 13, 2013
2. Pry Family Upheaval Marker
The Pry House, which served as Gen. McClellan's headquarters during the Battle of Antietam and as a hospital afterwards, can be seen behind the marker.
. Marker is located at the Pry House Field Hospital Museum. Marker is at or near this postal address: 18906 Shepherdstown Pike, Keedysville MD 21756, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Army Headquarters (here, next to this marker); Second Army Corps (approx. 0.2 miles away); Humphreys' Division, Fifth Army Corps (approx. half a mile away but has been reported missing); Morell's Division, Fifth Army Corps (approx. half a mile away but has been reported missing); Fifth Army Corps (approx. half a mile away); a different marker also named Second Army Corps (approx. half a mile away but has been reported missing); Richardson's Division, Second Army Corps (approx. half a mile away but has been reported missing); Pry’s Mill Bridge (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Keedysville.
 
More about this marker. On the lower left of the marker are two portraits captioned, Photographs of Philip and Elizabeth Pry taken in Tennessee years after the battle. At the time of the battle the Prys had six children ranging in age from one to fourteen. The 1860 census showed two free African-American women living in the household—Amanda Samper, age twenty, and Georgiana Rollins, age twelve. The middle
Pry Family Upheaval Marker image. Click for full size.
February 21, 2011
3. Pry Family Upheaval Marker
The right of two NPS markers at the Pry House.
of the marker displays a list captioned, This list from one of Philip Pry’s claims shows the extensive damage to his family’s farm. The claims investigation stated that “the war made him poor and he immigrated to Tennessee to begin life anew.” On the upper right of the marker is a photo captioned, Photograph of the Pry Farm at the time of the battle.

On the lower right is a photo which labels six locations with black arrows and captions. The locations labeled are (clockwise from bottom center):
-YOU ARE HERE
-The Union Army gathered on this side of Antietam Creek
- The Confederate Army gathered on the high ground west of Antietam Creek
- Visitor Center is 1.5 miles west
- Mumma Barn
- Antietam Creek flows through this line of trees from right to left

The bottom of the marker notes that The Pry House Field Hospital Museum is open through a partnership between the National Park Service and the National Museum of Civil War Medicine.
 
Also see . . .
1. Pry House Field Hospital Museum. National Museum of Civil War Medicine (Submitted on February 21, 2011.) 

2. Pry House Field Hospital Museum. National Park Service (Submitted on February 21, 2011.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Close-up of Photo on Marker image. Click for full size.
February 21, 2011
4. Close-up of Photo on Marker
The Pry Farm image. Click for full size.
February 21, 2011
5. The Pry Farm
View to the west.
Pry Family Hospital image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 13, 2013
6. Pry Family Hospital
After the battle, the Pry House served as a hospital. This display inside the house shows an army doctor treating a wounded soldier.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 21, 2011. This page has been viewed 853 times since then and 23 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on February 21, 2011.   2. submitted on August 23, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3, 4, 5. submitted on February 21, 2011.   6. submitted on August 23, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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