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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Greenbelt in Prince George's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Greenbelt Park

 
 
Greenbelt Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, March 26, 2011
1. Greenbelt Park Marker
Inscription.
This is a place of contrast. Once this land was covered with virgin forest, then it was farmland, and then a proposed housing development. Now it is an alluring refuge within an ever-growing sea of development. Here you can find wilderness, wildlife, and solitude—only twelve miles from downtown Washington.

In 1875, this land was denuded; farmhouses, fencelines, and dirt paths crisscrossed the landscape. Tobacco, corn, and grain grew where now maples and elms tower. A few hints of that era survive, but this is now a land dominated by nature. The trees, underbrush, and wildlife here collectively tell the story of natureís recovery. They repeatedly tell us: when left alone, nature will heal itself.

[Illustration captions:]
The 174-site campground is open year-round. It is the closest campground to downtown Washington.

Greenbelt Park has become an urban oasis. Over the past 60 years, the population of the surrounding land has grown from about 3,000 to more than 20,000.

The park is a refuge for both people and wildlife. Park staff and volunteers work at reforestation, wildlife management, improving water quality, and bringing greater awareness to visitors.

The park includes a campground, three picnic areas, and nature and bridle trails. The Baltimore-Washington Parkway
Greenbelt Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, March 23, 2011
2. Greenbelt Park Marker
links the park with downtown Washington, twelve miles south.

Dedicated in 1954, the parkway (a unit of the National Park Service) is the historic gateway to the Nationís Capital for visitors arriving from the eastern seaboard.
[Map of Greenbelt Park and the surrounding roadways]
 
Erected by National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 38° 58.752′ N, 76° 53.86′ W. Marker is in Greenbelt, Maryland, in Prince George's County. Marker is on Campground Road west of Park Central Road, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at the southwest corner of the ranger station, east of the entrance to the camping area. Marker is at or near this postal address: 6565 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt MD 20770, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within one mile of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Water (here, next to this marker); Greenbelt: A Bold Experiment (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Greenbelt Park (approx. 0.6 miles away); Carrington Avenue (approx. 0.9 miles away); Charlton Avenue (approx. 0.9 miles away); Time of Horror
Greenbelt Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, March 23, 2011
3. Greenbelt Park Marker
(approx. one mile away); a different marker also named Greenbelt Park (approx. one mile away); a different marker also named Greenbelt: A Bold Experiment (approx. one mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Greenbelt.
 
Also see . . .  Grenbelt Park. National Park Service (Submitted on March 31, 2011, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. EnvironmentHorticulture & Forestry
 
Greenbelt Park - signage at entrance off Greenbelt Rd. (MD 193) image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, March 26, 2011
4. Greenbelt Park - signage at entrance off Greenbelt Rd. (MD 193)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 27, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 435 times since then and 27 times this year. Last updated on March 29, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on March 27, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   4. submitted on March 28, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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