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Fishers Hill in Shenandoah County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Fisher's Hill Battlefield

Veteran's Picnic Grounds

 
 
Fisher's Hill Battlefield Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, December 1, 2007
1. Fisher's Hill Battlefield Marker
Inscription. Soon after the end of the Civil War, veterans on both sides began holding reunions to walk the familiar battlegrounds and renew friendships with former comrades. Here at Fisher's Hill, veterans of the battle fought on September 22, 1864, started gathering in the 1880s to commemorate their war experiences. Local veterans and others purchased portions of the battlefield land to hold annual picnics. Over the years, hundreds and then thousands of Northern and Southern veterans attended with their families and friends. Participants from outside the local area took trains to nearby Strasburg, or to Staunton, 80 miles south, then journeyed here to the reunion each August. At their peak of popularity, these reunions often attracted 9,000-10,000 people. Here at Fisher's Hill there was a steam-powered mery-go-round as well as barbeque pits and picnic areas. National and state dignitaries often spoke at the reunions.

Such gatherings of veterans served several purposes, including battlefield preservation as well as opportunities to reminisce. Veteran's organizations, ladies' commemoration and memorialization societies, and other such groups were active in finding and laying to rest soldiers' remains dedicating and maintaining cemeteries, purchasing battlefield land, marking key sites with monuments, and honoring the service and valor of Civil
Battle Map image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, December 1, 2007
2. Battle Map
War soldiers on both sides.
 
Erected by Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 38° 59.04′ N, 78° 23.805′ W. Marker is in Fishers Hill, Virginia, in Shenandoah County. Marker is at the intersection of Battlefield Road (County Route 601) and Tripplet Road (County Route 821), on the right when traveling west on Battlefield Road. Touch for map. Located just to the east of the Norfolk Southern Railroad overpass. Marker is in this post office area: Fishers Hill VA 22626, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Stoner-Keller House & Mill (approx. 0.2 miles away); Valley Pike (approx. half a mile away); The Battle of Fishers Hill (approx. 0.6 miles away); a different marker also named Battle of Fisher's Hill (approx. 0.7 miles away); a different marker also named Battle of Fisher's Hill (approx. 0.8 miles away); Fisher's Hill (approx. 1.1 miles away); a different marker also named Battle of Fisher’s Hill (approx. 1.1 miles away); a different marker also named Fisher’s Hill (approx. 1.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fishers Hill.
 
More about this marker.
Fisher's Hill Battlefield Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, December 1, 2007
3. Fisher's Hill Battlefield Marker
On the lower left is a map of the Fisher's Hill battle. On the right is a set of "Photographs from period magazines" which "depict the festive and community nature of the picnic." The set is titled Notable Gathering of Virginia's Old Guard - Interesting glimpses of the recent Confederate Veterans' Reunion at Fisher's Hill, VA. The photos show a Federal veteran and Confederate veteran shaking hands, a gathering of ladies listening to a veteran tell of the war, dignitaries speaking, and a group photo of the veterans at the reunion.
 
Regarding Fisher's Hill Battlefield. This is one of several markers interpreting the Battle of Fisher's Hill. See the Battle of Fisher's Hill Virtual Tour by Markers linked below.
 
Also see . . .
1. Battle of Fisher's Hill Virtual Tour by Markers. Eight markers that document the battle of Fisher's Hill, September 20-21, 1864. (Submitted on December 16, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Fisher's Hill (21-22 September 1864). National Park Service. (Submitted on April 4, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
"Comrades True, The Gray and the Blue" image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 3, 2017
4. "Comrades True, The Gray and the Blue"
John Kilham, 1st Maryland Cavalry, shaking hands with General A. D. Funkhauser, of the Confederate Veterans, at Reunion.
Close-up of photo on marker
A Complete Capitulation image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 3, 2017
5. A Complete Capitulation
Senator [John W.] Daniel, captured by a number of the pretty Daughters of the Confederacy after his happy and eloquent speech to the Veterans.
Close-up of photo on marker
Speech by Senator Daniel image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 3, 2017
6. Speech by Senator Daniel
No Confederate Reunion is complete in Virginia without a speech from Senator Daniel, Who is seen here addressing the Great Gathering at Fisher's Hill.

“John Warwick Daniel (September 5, 1842 – June 29, 1910) was an American lawyer, author, and Democratic politician from Lynchburg, Virginia who promoted the Lost Cause of the Confederacy.” — Wikipedia
Close-up of photo on marker
Some Distinguished Confederate Veterans who Attended the Reunion image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 3, 2017
7. Some Distinguished Confederate Veterans who Attended the Reunion
Senator Daniel (X) was one of the most noted and daring Confederate fighters during the Civil War. He is almost idolized by his Civil War comrades, and is still the hero of every Virginia reunion.
Close-up of photo on marker
Norfolk Southern Railroad Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, December 1, 2007
8. Norfolk Southern Railroad Bridge
At the time of the battle the Manassas Gap Railroad ran across a span here. Out of operation due to the passing of the warring armies, the railroad line bisected the Confederate defenses at this point, at the point that Gordon's and Pegram's divisions were deployed.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 6, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 11, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,892 times since then and 118 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 11, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on April 4, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   8. submitted on December 16, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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