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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
U Street Corridor in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

African American Civil War Memorial

“Spirit of Freedom”

 

— Civil War to Civil Rights and Beyond —

 
African American Civil War Memorial - "Spirit of Freedom" image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, April 26, 2008
1. African American Civil War Memorial - "Spirit of Freedom"
Inscription.  This memorial is dedicated to those who served in the African American units of the Union Army in the Civil War. The 209,145 names inscribed on these walls commemorate those fighters of freedom.

[Names of the officers and enlisted men who served with the 166 regiments of the "United States Colored Troops" and other "African Descent" units during the War of the Rebellion.]
 
Erected 1998 by D.C. Arts and Humanities Commission and Civil War Memorial Freedom Foundation.
 
Location. 38° 54.992′ N, 77° 1.559′ W. Marker is in U Street Corridor, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of U Street Northwest and Vermont Avenue Northwest, on the right when traveling south on U Street Northwest. Marker is located in the plaza above the Metrorail subway elevator. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20001, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named African American Civil War Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Most Worshipful Prince Hall Grand Lodge of the District of Columbia
"Civil War to Civil Rights and Beyond. . ." image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, April 26, 2008
2. "Civil War to Civil Rights and Beyond. . ."
(within shouting distance of this marker); Civil War Camp to Victorian Neighborhood (was within shouting distance of this marker but has been reported missing. ); Evans-Tibbs House (within shouting distance of this marker); Sailors / With Freedom Came the Greater YOU (within shouting distance of this marker); Pioneers / With Freedom Came Their Community (within shouting distance of this marker); Musicians / With Freedom Came Their Businesses (within shouting distance of this marker); Artillery / With Freedom Came Their Cultural Icons (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in U Street Corridor.
 
Also see . . .
1. African American Civil War Memorial in Wikipedia. (Submitted on May 4, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
2. The Battle of the Black Civil War Memorial. (Submitted on May 4, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
3. African American Civil War Memorial and Museum. (Submitted on January 16, 2012, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional keywords.
"Spirit of Freedom" - Ed Hamilton, Sculptor. image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, April 26, 2008
3. "Spirit of Freedom" - Ed Hamilton, Sculptor.
Ed Hamilton, sculptor; United States Colored Troops; USCT; Corps d’Afrique; U.S. Navy; African American Civil War Museum.
 
Categories. African AmericansHeroesMilitaryWar, US Civil
 
African American Civil War Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, April 26, 2008
4. African American Civil War Memorial
View from the corner of U Street and Vermont Avenue, NW. The "Spirit of Freedom" sculpture is visible in middle left, the Prince Hall Masonic Temple Building is in upper right.
The sculptor, Ed Hamilton, delivers "The Spirit of Freedom" image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 16, 1998
5. The sculptor, Ed Hamilton, delivers "The Spirit of Freedom"
"The Spirit of Freedom" is lowered into place at the still unfinished memorial image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 16, 1998
6. "The Spirit of Freedom" is lowered into place at the still unfinished memorial
Civil War Reenactors, Dedication Parade, 1998 image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 16, 1998
7. Civil War Reenactors, Dedication Parade, 1998
Washington DC's "B" Company, 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry on Georgia Avenue.
Wall of Names image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, April 26, 2008
8. Wall of Names
"Who would be free themselves must strike the blow. Better even die free than to live slaves!" Frederick Douglass, March 3, 1863.
The Spirit of Freedom's Black Sailor image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 16, 1998
9. The Spirit of Freedom's Black Sailor
Estimates for the number of African Americans in naval service during the Civil War range as high as 30,000. Eight were recipients of the Medal of Honor, but they served in integrated units and were not always identified by race. Their names are not included on this memorial.
Back (south) side of "Spirit of Freedom" image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 16, 1998
10. Back (south) side of "Spirit of Freedom"
A family's blessing for a soldier going to war.
African American Civil War Museum (opened 2011) image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, April 15, 2011
11. African American Civil War Museum (opened 2011)
- entrance across Vermont Avenue from the Memorial.
 

More. Search the internet for African American Civil War Memorial.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 16, 2019. This page originally submitted on May 4, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 4,031 times since then and 29 times this year. Last updated on April 16, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on May 4, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   5, 6. submitted on May 29, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   7. submitted on June 19, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   8. submitted on May 4, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   9. submitted on May 29, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   10. submitted on June 18, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   11. submitted on April 19, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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