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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Dunn in Harnett County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Battle of Averasboro

Phase One – March 15, 16, 1865

 
 
Battle of Averasboro	Phase One Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 18, 2006
1. Battle of Averasboro Phase One Marker
Inscription. You are standing near the center of the first phase of fighting in the Battle of Averasboro, March 15-16, 1865.

On March 15th the left wing of General Sherman’s Union army, commanded by General H.W. Slocum, was advancing along this road (A) from Fayetteville to Averasboro. General H.J. Kilpatrick’s cavalry division was in the lead, skirmishing with General Joseph Wheeler’s Confederate cavalry which contested the Union advance.

At 3:00 P.M. the Union forces struck a heavy Confederate skirmish line (B). General Smith Atkins’ 9th Michigan cavalry (C) drove the skirmishers back into the first of three lines of breastworks erected across the road (E-1). The Union cavalry then constructed heavy barricades (D) in front of the Confederate works.

At 6:00 P.M. Confederate General W.B. Taliaferro, whose division was holding position E-1, ordered an attack (F) along his line. The Union forces, though hard-pressed, were able to hold their position due to the arrival of reinforcements from the 14th Corps (G). Nightfall found the two armies in nearly the same positions they had held throughout the afternoon. General W.T. Sherman, Union commander, arrived on the field during the night.

At 6:00 A.M. on March 16th, the Union forces (H) attacked Taliaferro’s line, driving the Confederates before them. Then the Southerners launched
Battle of Averasboro Phase 1 Markers image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 18, 2006
2. Battle of Averasboro Phase 1 Markers
a desperate counter-attack (I). A disaster for the Union forces was averted when portions of the 20th Corps arrived upon the field (J). Three batteries of artillery (K) were placed in position near the John Smith house (L). These began firing upon the Confederates, driving them back into their breastworks.

At 11:00 A.M. two newly-arrived Union brigades (M) engaged the Confederates in front, while the brigade of Colonel Henry Case (N) assaulted the Confederate right flank. This attack forced the Confederates to withdraw into their second line of works (E-2).

NOTE: For the remainder of the battle, drive two miles north on this road and read the map-marker on phase two of the battle.
 
Erected 1961 by Archives and Highway Departments. Confederate Centennial Commission.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Battlefield Trails - Civil War marker series.
 
Location. Marker is missing. It was located near 35° 13.948′ N, 78° 40.717′ W. Marker was near Dunn, North Carolina, in Harnett County. Marker was at the intersection of Burnett Road (State Highway 82) and Ross West Road, on the right when traveling south on Burnett Road. Touch for map. Marker is on Route 82, about 6 miles south of Dunn, NC. Marker was in this post office area: Dunn NC 28335, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Battle of Averasboro Marker image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, April 20, 2011
3. Battle of Averasboro Marker
Now located next to the Smith house at 35 13 56.79N, 78 40 34.28W. Ross West Road in the background/house is to the right.
At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this location, measured as the crow flies. Prelude to Averasboro (here, next to this marker); Federal Hospital (within shouting distance of this marker); Federal Artillery (approx. one mile away); Oak Grove (approx. 1.1 miles away); David M. Williams (approx. 1.2 miles away); Confederate First Line (approx. 1.3 miles away); Taliaferro’s Division (approx. 1.3 miles away); 20th Corps (approx. 1.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Dunn.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Battle of Averasboro by markers.
 
Also see . . .
1. Averasboro Battlefield and Museum. (Submitted on March 1, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
2. The Battle of Averasboro - March 16, 1865. Marion County in the War Between the States - SCGenWeb site. (Submitted on December 23, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Battle of Averasboro Marker image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, April 20, 2011
4. Battle of Averasboro Marker
Located next to the Smith house, future home of the Transportation Museum, owned & operated by the Averasboro Battlefield Commission, Inc.
March 15 Battle Map image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 18, 2006
5. March 15 Battle Map
This battle map appears on the upper left portion of the Battle of Averasboro Phase 1 Marker.
March 16 Battle Map image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 18, 2006
6. March 16 Battle Map
This battle map appears on the Lower right portion of the Battle of Averasboro Phase 1 Marker.
"Oak Grove" - Site of the John Smith House image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 18, 2006
7. "Oak Grove" - Site of the John Smith House
This is the location of the John Smith House, where Union batteries were set up on the morning of March 16, 1865, during the Battle of Averasboro.
Battle of Averasboro (Missing Marker) image. Click for full size.
By Robert Cole, June 11, 2010
8. Battle of Averasboro (Missing Marker)
According to an Averasboro Battlefield Museum employee, the marker and structure were taken down, both because it lay on private property and because they want to relocate it to the Confederate Hospital building ("Oak Grove") about one mile to the north, presently under restoration. The marker shown in the background of this photo identifies the house used as the Federal Hospital during the battle about 1/4 mile east.
Battle of Averasboro (Missing Marker) image. Click for full size.
By Robert Cole, June 11, 2010
9. Battle of Averasboro (Missing Marker)
Another view of the site where the Battle of Averasboro marker was located, prior to being removed. Museum officials assured that the marker will be restored completely at the Confederate Hospital location once construction is completed.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 29, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 2,147 times since then and 96 times this year. Last updated on April 26, 2011, by Lee Hattabaugh of Capshaw, Alabama. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on February 29, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3, 4. submitted on April 26, 2011, by Lee Hattabaugh of Capshaw, Alabama.   5, 6, 7. submitted on February 29, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   8, 9. submitted on June 13, 2010, by Cleo Robertson of Fort Lauderdale, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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