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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Burlington in Alamance County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The John Allen House

 
 
The John Allen House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Patrick G. Jordan, May 8, 2011
1. The John Allen House Marker
Inscription. Quaker John Allen constructed this log dwelling circa 1780 in nearby Snow Camp. The State of North Carolina moved it here in 1966, restored it, and opened it to the public in 1967 to illustrate colonial life in the backcountry of North Carolina. The structure contains a main living area, a sleeping quarters, two porches, and a cellar for storing foods. Allen family descendants lived in the home until 1929 and made changes that included glass windows and exterior weatherboarding. All of the more recent additions were removed during the renovations.

Although John had no direct involvement in the Regulator Movement or the Battle of Alamance, his brother-in-law, Herman Husband, played a prominent role. Herman married John's sister, Amy. The Regulators viewed Husband as their leader for needed change in colonial government policy.

John Allen and his wife, Rachel, had twelve children. The couple was well respected in the area. John farmed, taught school, practiced law, and possibly operated a store in the room on the back porch, where medicine and yarn goods were sold. Known as a "traveling doctor," Rachel used natural/herbal remedies, which she recorded in her handmade medical book, to treat the sick. John and Rachel are buried in the cemetery at Cane Creek Meeting in Snow Camp.

Background: A portion of the
The John Allen House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Patrick G. Jordan, May 8, 2011
2. The John Allen House Marker
1770 John Collet map of North Carolina showing landmarks and family names in the area prior to the Battle of Alamance.


 
Erected 2011 by Alamance County Tourism Development Authority and Convention and Visitors Bureau.
 
Location. 36° 0.609′ N, 79° 31.301′ W. Marker is in Burlington, North Carolina, in Alamance County. Marker is on NC Highway 62, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Located at Alamance Battleground, a State of North Carolina Historic Site. Directions from I-85/40. Exit 143. Travel South on NC Highway 62 for 5.8 miles. Entrance to Battleground is on the right. Marker is at or near this postal address: 5803 NC Highway 62 South, Burlington NC 27215, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Battle of Alamance (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); First Battle of the Revolution (about 700 feet away); The Regulators' Field (about 700 feet away); a different marker also named Battle of Alamance (about 700 feet away); The Battle of the Alamance (approx. 0.2 miles away); Battle of Clapp's Mill (approx. 0.6
The house being moved to the site in 1966 image. Click for full size.
By Patrick G. Jordan, May 8, 2011
3. The house being moved to the site in 1966
miles away); a different marker also named Battle of Clapp's Mill (approx. 1.8 miles away); Oak Grove Plantation (approx. 1.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Burlington.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .  The Allen House. NC Historic Sites, Alamance Battleground website (Submitted on May 8, 2011, by Patrick G. Jordan of Burlington, North Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraNotable Buildings
 
The John Allen House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Patrick G. Jordan, May 8, 2011
4. The John Allen House Marker
The Allen House shortly after restoration image. Click for full size.
By Patrick G. Jordan, May 8, 2011
5. The Allen House shortly after restoration
The Allen house before being restored image. Click for full size.
By Patrick G. Jordan, May 8, 2011
6. The Allen house before being restored
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 8, 2011, by Patrick G. Jordan of Burlington, North Carolina. This page has been viewed 855 times since then and 38 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on May 8, 2011, by Patrick G. Jordan of Burlington, North Carolina. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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