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Trenton in Mercer County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Quakers Lead the Settlement of West Jersey

 
 
Quakers Lead the Settlement of West Jersey Marker image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
1. Quakers Lead the Settlement of West Jersey Marker
Inscription. In the 1670s and 1680s, most of the proprietors of the Province of West Jersey were Quakers. Quakers were attracted to the new colony by the promise of economic prosperity and religious freedom as well as the opportunity to raise families in a setting free from the constraints they had encountered in England. Although Quakers are better known fir their role in the colonization of Pennsylvania, they actually settled in New Jersey first. William Penn, the Proprietor of Pennsylvania, was involved in both enterprises.

Quaker beliefs, based on the concept of the “inner light” or direct spiritual contact with God, were formulated in England in the 1650s and 1660s by a group of preachers, chief among them George Fox. The religious movement rapidly coalesced into the Society of Friends, but was banned from group worship in England in 1662. Quakerism does not employ a paid ministry, but rather relies on personal example and self-discipline to spread its doctrine of plain living, hard work and peaceful co-existence.

Quakers from Yorkshire and the North Midlands of England, families like the Stacys and the Lamberts, were at the forefront of settlement in the Middle Delaware valley in the final quarter of the 17th century. They established large farms and practiced Quaker worship at meetings held initially in private
The four subject markers under the 17th Century Arch image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
2. The four subject markers under the 17th Century Arch
homes and, later, at the nearest meetinghouse. The first Quaker meetinghouses in the area were built in the late 17th and early 18th centuries and were located in the city of Burlington, the capital of West Jersey, and in the villages of Crosswicks in Chesterfield Township, Stony Brook outside Princeton and Fallsington in Bucks County. A meetinghouse was not built in Trenton until 1739.

Links to learn more – Quaker Meetinghouses in Trenton, Fallsington and elsewhere in the region
 
Erected 2004 by New Jersey Department of Transportation.
 
Location. 40° 11.887′ N, 74° 45.498′ W. Marker is in Trenton, New Jersey, in Mercer County. Marker can be reached from U.S. 29. Touch for map. This marker is part of South River Walk Park which is built over Route 29. Marker is in this post office area: Trenton NJ 08611, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Europeans at the Falls of the Delaware (here, next to this marker); The West Jersey Proprietors Rule (here, next to this marker); William Trent of Trentís Town (here, next to this marker); Pre-17th Century Trenton Timeline (here, next to this marker); Native American Artifacts – Clubs to Prehistory (here, next to this marker); Who, What and Where were Sanhickans? (here, next to this marker); Native Americans Exchange Furs for European Goods (here, next to this marker); What happened to the Lenape? (here, next to this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Trenton.
 
More about this marker. This is one of 4 subject markers under the 17th Century Arch.
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.Colonial EraNotable PersonsSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 16, 2007, by Gary Nigh of Trenton, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,008 times since then and 22 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 16, 2007, by Gary Nigh of Trenton, New Jersey. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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