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Eastchester in Westchester County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Congressional Medal of Honor Memorial

 
 
Congressional Medal of Honor Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, May 10, 2011
1. Congressional Medal of Honor Memorial Marker
Inscription.
Eastchester – Tuckahoe – Bronxville
Congressional Medal of Honor Memorial
This memorial is erected to honor the memory and courage
of the soldiers, sailors and airmen of our commumity
who valiantly sacrificed their lives for
fellow soldiers and their country
Dedicated June 13, 2009
Supervisor Anthony S. Colavita
Councilwoman Vicki Ford
Councilwoman Sheila Marcotte
Councilman Michael Cahalin
Councilman Christine Doody Doherty
Pat Pilenza Builder   Peter F. Gaito Designer

 
Erected 2009.
 
Location. 40° 57.894′ N, 73° 48.546′ W. Marker is in Eastchester, New York, in Westchester County. Marker is at the intersection of White Plains Road (New York State Route 22) and California Road, on the left when traveling south on White Plains Road. Touch for map. Located in Eastchester Memorial Park. Marker is in this post office area: Eastchester NY 10709, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Gold Star Mothers Memorial (a few steps from this marker); Eastchester Memorial Park (within shouting distance of this marker); Scarsdale Bicentennial Time Capsule
Richard William O'Neill image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, May 10, 2011
2. Richard William O'Neill
Richard William O'Neill
U.S. Army
Medal of Honor, World War I
Rank and Organization: Sergeant, U.S. Army, Company D, 165th Infantry, 42nd Division.
Place and Date: On the Ourcq River, France, 30 July 1918
Citation:
In advance of an assault line, he attacked a detachment of about 25 of the enemy. In the ensuing hand-to-hand encounter he sustained pistol wounds, but heroically continued in the advance, during which he received additional wounds: but, with great physical effort, he remained in active command of his detachment. Being again wounded, he was forced by weakness and loss of blood to be evacuated, but insisted upon being taken first to the battalion commander in order to transmit to him valuable information relative to enemy positions and the disposition of our men.
(approx. 1.8 miles away); Wayside Inn (approx. 2 miles away); Site of Daniel D. Tompkins Birthplace (approx. 2.6 miles away); Westchester County (approx. 2.7 miles away); Gen. Howe’s Headquarters (approx. 3.1 miles away); Ardsley World War I Honor Roll (approx. 3.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Eastchester.
 
Also see . . .
1. Richard W. O'Neill on Wikipedia. (Submitted on May 17, 2011, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
2. Robert C. Murray on Wikipedia. (Submitted on May 17, 2011, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
3. Ralph Cheli on Wikipedia. (Submitted on May 17, 2011, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
 
Categories. Heroes
 
Robert C. Murray image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, May 10, 2011
3. Robert C. Murray
Robert C. Murray
U.S. Army
Medal of Honor, Vietnam War
Rank and Organization: Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, Company B, 4th Battalion, 31st Infantry Brigade, 23rd Infantry Division
Place and Date: Near the village of Hiep Duc, Republic of Vietnam, 7 June 1970
Citation:
S/Sgt. Murray distinguished himself while serving as a squad leader with Company B. S/Sgt. Murray's squad was searching for an enemy mortar that had been threatening friendly positions when a member of the squad tripped an enemy grenade rigged as a booby trap. Realizing that he had activated the enemy booby trap, the soldier shouted for everybody to take cover. Instantly assessing the danger to the men of his squad, S/Sgt. Murray unhesitatingly and with complete disregard for his own safety, threw himself on the grenade absorbing the full and fatal impact of the explosion. By his gallant action and self sacrifice, he prevented the death or injury of the other members of his squad. S/Sgt. Murray's extraordinary courage and gallantry, at the cost of his life above and beyond the call of duty, are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on him, his unit, and the U.S. Army.
Major Cheli image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, May 10, 2011
4. Major Cheli
Major Cheli
U.S. Army Air Corps
Medal of Honor, World War II
Rank and Organization: Major, U.S. Army Air Corps.
Place and Date: Near Wewak, New Guinea, 18 August 1943, Entered service at Brooklyn, N.Y.
Citation:
For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action with the enemy. While Maj. Cheli was leading his squadron in a dive to attack the heavily defended Dagua Airdrome, intercepting enemy aircraft centered their fire on his plane, causing it to burst into flames while still 2 miles from the objective. His speed would have enabled him to gain necessary altitude to parachute to safety, but this action would have resulted in his formation becoming disorganized and exposed to the enemy. Although a crash was inevitable, he courageously elected to continue leading the attack in his blazing plane. From a minimum altitude, the squadron made a devastating bombing and strafing attack on the target. The mission completed, Maj. Cheli instructed his wingman to lead the formation and crashed into the sea.
Congressional Medal of Honor Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, May 10, 2011
5. Congressional Medal of Honor Memorial
Congressional Medal of Honor Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, May 10, 2011
6. Congressional Medal of Honor Memorial
The sculpture is a World War I Infantryman, kneeling, and a World War II Infantryman, raising the flag.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 17, 2011, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 557 times since then and 45 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on May 17, 2011, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.
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