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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Hingham in Plymouth County, Massachusetts — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Samuel Lincoln House

1630 - 1930

 
 
Samuel Lincoln House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Roger W. Sinnott, May 21, 2011
1. Samuel Lincoln House Marker
Inscription. Samuel Lincoln, ancestor of President Abraham Lincoln, and one of the eight early settlers of Hingham bearing that name, purchased this land in 1649. Seven generations of Lincoln descendants lived here.
 
Erected 1930 by the Massachusetts Bay Colony Tercentenary Commission.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Massachusetts Bay Colony—Tercentenary Commission Markers marker series.
 
Location. 42° 14.559′ N, 70° 53.485′ W. Marker is in Hingham, Massachusetts, in Plymouth County. Marker is at the intersection of North Street and Lincoln Street, on the right when traveling east on North Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 170 North Street, Hingham MA 02043, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Hingham Massachusetts (approx. 0.2 miles away); Old Ship Church (approx. mile away); Reverend Peter Hobart (approx. mile away); Hull (approx. 2.8 miles away); a different marker also named Hull (approx. 4.2 miles away); Fort Independence (approx.
Samuel Lincoln House image. Click for full size.
By Roger W. Sinnott, May 21, 2011
2. Samuel Lincoln House
The marker is in the front yard of the house.
4.3 miles away); Minot's Ledge Lighthouse (approx. 5.3 miles away); Antoine and Wilson Memorial (approx. 5.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Hingham.
 
Regarding Samuel Lincoln House. Arriving from Norfolk, England, Samuel Lincoln bought land in Hingham. One of his grandsons, also named Samuel, built the present house here.

The direct male line of Lincolns from the immigrant Samuel to the 16th U.S. President runs as follows: Samuel (1622–1690), Mordecai (1657–1727), Mordecai (1686–1736), John (1711–1778), Abraham (1744–1786), Thomas (1780–1851), Abraham (1809–1865).
 
Also see . . .
1. Wikipedia. This entry mentions several Lincolns who became prominent citizens of Hingham during the 17th and 18th centuries. (Submitted on May 22, 2011, by Roger W. Sinnott of Chelmsford, Massachusetts.) 

2. Family tree. A detailed compilation by genealogist Rhonda R. McClure. (Submitted on May 22, 2011, by Roger W. Sinnott of Chelmsford, Massachusetts.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraPoliticsSettlements & Settlers
 
Sign on the House image. Click for full size.
By Roger W. Sinnott, May 21, 2011
3. Sign on the House
The superscript 3 after Samuel refers to a grandson of the immigrant. This grandson was not part of the direct line to the future president.
Statue of Abraham Lincoln image. Click for full size.
By Roger W. Sinnott, May 21, 2011
4. Statue of Abraham Lincoln
Erected in 1939, this statue of Abraham Lincoln is in the small park directly across North Street from the Samuel Lincoln House. The president himself never lived in Hingham.
Benjamin Lincoln Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Roger W. Sinnott, May 21, 2011
5. Benjamin Lincoln Tablet
Benjamin belonged to one of the other Lincoln families in Hingham and is not known to be related to the future president. This tablet was erected by the Hingham Historical Society, and the inscription reads:
Benjamin Lincoln
1732–1810
Selectman 1765—1771
Town Clerk 1757—1776
Member of Provincial Congress
At Concord, Cambridge & Watertown
Major General in the Army of the Revolution
Secretary of War 1781—1783
Lieut-Governor of Mass. 1787
Collector of the Port of Boston 1789
President of the
Massachusetts Society of the Cincinnati
View of Park Looking South image. Click for full size.
By Roger W. Sinnott, May 21, 2011
6. View of Park Looking South
The Benjamin Lincoln tablet is in the foreground below center (in the shadows). The Lincoln statue sits in the middle of the park, and a part of the Samuel Lincoln House is seen in the distance at extreme right.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 22, 2011, by Roger W. Sinnott of Chelmsford, Massachusetts. This page has been viewed 1,068 times since then and 36 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on May 22, 2011, by Roger W. Sinnott of Chelmsford, Massachusetts. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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