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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Rome in Oneida County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Fort Bull

 
 
Fort Bull Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, August 17, 2008
1. Fort Bull Marker
Inscription.
250 Paces from
here is the site of
Fort Bull
the scene of fierce
struggles during the
early Indian Wars-
twenty years
before the revolution

 
Erected 1921 by Fort Stanwix Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution marker series.
 
Location. 43° 13.589′ N, 75° 30.163′ W. Marker is in Rome, New York, in Oneida County. Marker is on Rome-New London Road (New York State Route 49) half a mile south of Rome-Taberg Road (New York State Route 69), on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is beside the driveway entrance to the Erie Canal Village. Marker is at or near this postal address: 5789 Rome-New London Road, Rome NY 13440, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Erie Canal - July 4, 1817 (within shouting distance of this marker); Erie Canal Enlargement (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Clinton's Ditch (about 700 feet away); a different marker also named Fort Bull (approx.
Fort Bull Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, August 17, 2008
2. Fort Bull Marker
0.2 miles away); Erie Canal (approx. mile away); U.S. Arsenal (approx. 1.9 miles away); The Oneida Carrying Place (approx. 2.2 miles away); Jervis Library (approx. 2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Rome.
 
Regarding Fort Bull. In 1754, hostilities broke out in America between England and France which led to the French and Indian (or Seven Years) War. In 1755, the British built two small stockade forts at the Oneida Carry to safeguard the supply lines to their posts at Oswego. Fort Williams sat at the Mohawk River end of the carry, while Fort Bull sat on the Wood Creek end. In March of 1756, a mixed force of French, Canadian, and Indians attacked a supply column on the carry, and they also attacked and destroyed Fort Bull. The British responded by strengthening their presence on the carry. Fort Wood Creek, a larger and stronger fort, was built where Fort Bull had sat
 
Also see . . .
1. Fort Bull. New York State Military Museum and Veterans Research Center (Submitted on June 4, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.) 

2. Erie Canal Village. (Submitted on June 4, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.)
Fort Bull Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, August 17, 2008
3. Fort Bull Marker

 
Categories. War, French and Indian
 
Fort Bull Marker at Erie Canal Village Entrance image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, August 17, 2008
4. Fort Bull Marker at Erie Canal Village Entrance
The Fort Bull Marker, in the background on the right, is at the entrance to the Erie Canal Village on Routes 46 & 49.
Fort Bull Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 29, 2011
5. Fort Bull Marker
View looking east along Rome-New London Road, of the backside of the historical marker and of the entrance to the historic Erie Canal Village.
Fort Bull Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 29, 2011
6. Fort Bull Marker
View of the historical marker in front of several structures that are part of the historic Erie Canal Village.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 4, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. This page has been viewed 1,136 times since then and 81 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on June 4, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.   5, 6. submitted on April 7, 2012, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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