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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Hartford in Hartford County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Prudence Crandall

 
 
Prudence Crandall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, June 19, 2011
1. Prudence Crandall Marker
Inscription.
Prudence Crandall
Where You Are Standing
on May 24, 1833
The Connecticut General Assembly passes the Black Law expressly forbidding Prudence Crandall from recruiting African-American women for her school in Canterbury. Prudence refuses to obey the Black Law and is arrested and jailed. Her case is taken up by the Abolition Movement to attract nationwide attention to the injustices of slavery and prejudice. After almost two years of legal struggles and harassment of her students, Prudence's conviction is overturned by the Connecticut Supreme Court meeting in this place, and in 1838 the Black Law is repealed here. Even so, Prudence is forced to close her school for fear of her student's safety. Towards the end of her life, the General Assembly meeting here awards Prudence a pension to compensate her for the injustices done to her.

Prudence Crandall sculpture by Randy Nelson, 1996
Made possible by a grant from The Hartford Courant Foundation
 
Erected 1996.
 
Location. 41° 45.954′ N, 72° 40.375′ W. Marker is in Hartford, Connecticut, in Hartford County. Marker is at the intersection of Central Row and Main Street, on the right when traveling west on Central Row. Touch for map
Prudence Crandall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, June 19, 2011
2. Prudence Crandall Marker
. Located in front of Connecticut's Old State House. Marker is at or near this postal address: 800 Main Street, Hartford CT 06103, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Marquis de La Fayette (here, next to this marker); Washington – Rochambeau Revolutionary Route (a few steps from this marker); The First Meeting of Washington and Rochambeau (within shouting distance of this marker); Governor's Foot Guard (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Governor's Foot Guard (within shouting distance of this marker); World's First Pay Telephone (within shouting distance of this marker); Old State House (within shouting distance of this marker); George Washington (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Hartford.
 
Also see . . .
1. Prudence Crandall Biography. (Submitted on June 26, 2011, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
2. Prudence Crandall (1803-1890), National Women's History Museum. (Submitted on June 26, 2011, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
 
Categories. African AmericansEducation
 
Steps to Connecticut's Old State House image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, June 19, 2011
3. Steps to Connecticut's Old State House
The Prudence Crandall marker is to the right of the steps.
Prudence Crandall Statue and Student "Gabriel Koren" image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, September 25, 2012
4. Prudence Crandall Statue and Student "Gabriel Koren"
Statues can be seen on 1st floor of the Connecticut Capitol Building.
Prudence Crandall Plaque inside Capitol Building near Statues. image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, September 25, 2012
5. Prudence Crandall Plaque inside Capitol Building near Statues.
Prudence Crandall 1803-1890 Connecticut State Heroine Prudence Crandall was educated at a society of friends school in Plainfield, Connecticut, after which she established her own private academy for girls at Canterbury. The school was a great success until she admitted an African-American girl which made local people furious. A committed Quaker, Prudence refused to change her policy of educating black and white students together and parents began taking their children away from the school. As a result, on April 1, 1933 with the support of William Lloyd Garrison and the Anti-slavery society, she founded a school for "Young" Ladies and Misses of Color". The school was forced to close after being harassed an attacked by a mob.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 26, 2011, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 669 times since then and 30 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on June 26, 2011, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.   4, 5. submitted on October 4, 2012, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa.
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