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Green Bay in Brown County, Wisconsin — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Influence of the Fur Trade

Green Bay was home...

 

—Fox River Trail —

 
Influence of the Fur Trade Marker image. Click for full size.
By Robert L Weber
1. Influence of the Fur Trade Marker
Inscription.
to many people for thousands of years before the first Europeans arrived. The rich waters of the bay attracted a number of American Indian Tribes - all members of a large and complex trading network stretching throughout North America.

Green Bay's first European visitors also wanted to trade, but they were only interested in one item: beaver furs. From the 1600s to the 1830s, no fashion accessory was more important for the well-dressed European man than a hat made from beaver fur. The desire for beaver pelts brought French and later British traders to Green Bay to buy beaver from American Indians for shipment back to European hatmakers.

At this location around 1745, a settlement developed around the home of the fur traders Augustin and Charles De Langlade. With close contact between the American Indian tribes and the Europeans, it was common for French traders to marry American Indian women.

Augustin's wife, Domitelle, had contacts with local tribes that made the family business a success. Biracial marriages resulted in the growth of what was known as a Metis society, of which Charles De Langlade was a member, being half-French and half-Ottawa. Charles became a prominent and influential settler, known for his bravery, diplomacy and success in the fur trade.

The imprint of early settlers
Marker, Fox River and Mason Street Bridge. image. Click for full size.
By Robert L Weber, June 6, 2011
2. Marker, Fox River and Mason Street Bridge.
on the land today is still visible in the shape of the land parcels, or French “long lots.” The narrow but deep lots run perpendicular to the water and stretch from Green Bay to the rapids in De Pere on both sides of the Fox River.
 
Location. 44° 30.696′ N, 88° 1.158′ W. Marker is in Green Bay, Wisconsin, in Brown County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of South Washington Street and Crooks Street. Touch for map. Located on the Fox River Trail. Marker is in this post office area: Green Bay WI 54301, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Augustin de Langlade (within shouting distance of this marker); Vice Admiral James H. Flatley Jr. (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Freimann Hotel Building (about 400 feet away); Milwaukee Road Depot (about 400 feet away); Milwaukee Road Passenger Depot (about 400 feet away); Packers Office Building (about 400 feet away); Elks Club (approx. 0.2 miles away); Bank Of Wisconsin (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Green Bay.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Fur Trade Era: 1650s to 1850s. Wisconsin Historical Society (Submitted on June 26, 2011, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.)
Marker and Artwork along the Fox River Trail. image. Click for full size.
By Robert L Weber, June 6, 2011
3. Marker and Artwork along the Fox River Trail.
 

2. Fur Trade. Heritage Hill State Historical Park (Submitted on June 26, 2011, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 

3. Fox River Trail. (Submitted on June 27, 2011, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.)
 
Categories. Native AmericansSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 26, 2011, by Bob (peach) Weber of Prescott Valley, Arizona. This page has been viewed 780 times since then and 44 times this year. Last updated on June 27, 2011, by Bob (peach) Weber of Prescott Valley, Arizona. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on June 26, 2011, by Bob (peach) Weber of Prescott Valley, Arizona. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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