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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Tazewell in Tazewell County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Burke’s Garden

 
 
Burke’s Garden Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 28, 2011
1. Burke’s Garden Marker
Inscription. Eight miles east is Burke’s Garden, discovered by James Burke in 1749. Major Lewis’s expedition against the Indians, 1756, camped there, and Burke’s fort was there in 1774. In 1781 Indians raided into Burke’s Garden, carrying off the wife and children of Thomas Ingles.
 
Erected 1929 by Conservation & Development Commission. (Marker Number XY-12.)
 
Location. 37° 7.508′ N, 81° 27.96′ W. Marker is near Tazewell, Virginia, in Tazewell County. Marker is on Gratton Road (Virginia Route 61) 1.3 miles east of the Tazewell corporate limits, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. The turnoff for Burkes Garden Road is 3.1 miles east of this marker at Gratton. Road mileage from the marker to Burke’s Garden valley is indeed about 8 miles. Marker is in this post office area: Tazewell VA 24651, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Molly Tynes’s Ride (a few steps from this marker but has been reported missing); First Court for Tazewell County (approx. 1.5 miles away); William Wynne’s Fort (approx. 1.6 miles away); Tazewell (approx. 3.4 miles away); Indian-Settler Conflicts
Burke’s Garden Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 28, 2011
2. Burke’s Garden Marker
(approx. 5 miles away); Pisgah United Methodist Church (approx. 5.9 miles away); Big Crab Orchard Or Witten’s Fort (approx. 5.9 miles away); a different marker also named Burke’s Garden (approx. 6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Tazewell.
 
More about this marker. This marker is listed in all of the guidebooks, from the first to the current, as marker number X-12.
 
Regarding Burke’s Garden. Back in 1880, George Vanderbilt—son of Cornelius Vanderbilt, one of the richest Americans in history—tried to buy the valley so he could build an elegant mountain retreat. No one would sell out to him. He built Biltmore House near Asheville, North Carolina, more than 150 miles south, but still in the Appalachian Mountains.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .  The Majesty of Burke’s Garden. 1993 article by Helen Barranger in Blue Ridge Country magazine. “ ‘He tried hard to buy it,’ says Burke’s Garden resident and ‘mayor’ Jim Hoge, who remembers his Grandmother Moss
Farm in the Eastern End of Burke's Garden Valley image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 28, 2011
3. Farm in the Eastern End of Burke's Garden Valley
telling how Vanderbilt stayed in the Moss home. ‘In those days to acquire land in Burke’s Garden one either had to heir it or marry it and Vanderbilt had done neither.’ So Vanderbilt put the 255-room Biltmore in Asheville, N.C., his second choice.” (Submitted on July 17, 2011.) 
 
Categories. Settlements & SettlersWars, US Indian
 
East End Road (County Route 625) in Burke’s Garden image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 28, 2011
4. East End Road (County Route 625) in Burke’s Garden
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 17, 2011, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 602 times since then and 23 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on July 17, 2011, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.
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